Browsing by Topic Islamic capital markets

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Showing results 70 to 79 of 151
  • chapter 5_the islamic capital market_obiyathulla.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath (2017)

  • Capital markets play an increasingly important role in modern economies. Though a part of the financial sector which they share with the banking system, capital markets while complementing banks can enhance risk sharing and thereby minimise macroeconomic vunerability. Economists typically divide the overall macro economy into two parts, the real sector and the financial sector. The real sector represents the productive capacity of the economy and produces the goods and services that accounts for a nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Ba)

  • chapter 7_islamic capital market_sukuk_ziyaad.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mahomed, Ziyaad (2017)

  • Sukuk are certificates of equal value that represent ownership in tangible assets, usufruct and services, and equity of identified project (AAOIFI, FAS 17 (2010)). They present undivided pro rata ownership of underliying assets (Securities Commission Malaysia, 2011). While sukuk are generally taken to be the counterpart of bonds, they differ from conventional bonds in six basic aspects (Ariff et al., 2012). This chapter explains the sukuk structure and its changing forms. Then, the chapter turns to the discussion of sukuk, capital structure and value of the firm. Before providing a conclusion. issues and challenges faced by the sukuk market are deliberated. Available in physical co...

  • islamic capital markets and development.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2013)

  • The question of whether capital markets (and the financial sector) are necessary for economic growth and development appeared to have been settled. However, the recent spate of financial crises and the devastating effect they have had on growth and macroeconomic stability have re-stoked questions; not so much about whether the capital markets are necessary for growth as whether they are playing the role expected of them.

  • islamic_capital_markets_comparative_approach_cover.jpg.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2013)

  • The book begins with an introductory chapter of founding thoughts of markets, asset prices, risk, uncertainty, and risk sharing. The risk-sharing philosophy runs throughout the book. The first three chapters provide the foundation. Chapter 4 through 12 examine each Islamic capital markets or conventional market and products. The final chapter, in providing an overall conclusion, examines the role of government in developing capital markets, specifically, Islamic capital markets.

  • Islamic_capital_markets.pdf.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Muhammad, Marjan; Sairally, Beebee Salma; Habib, Farrukh (2015)

  • The book presents the various aspects of the theory of Islamic capital markets (ICM) and its operations by starting with the simplest ideas and moving on to the complex applied issues. The topics covered include: an overview of ICM and its development; Shari'ah principles, contracts and issues; regulatory and governance frameworks; risk management, accounting and taxation issues; details on different segments of the ICM, including sukuk, Shari'ah-compliant stocks, Islamic fund management, Islamic private equity and venture capital, Islamic derivatives and Islamic structures investment products; and future directions for the ICM.

  • chapter 5_the islamic capital market_obiyathulla.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The global Islamic finance industry has evolved from a small industry to a dynamic, robust, and competitive one. Currently, the industry, built on the notion of justice and fairness, has a global asset size of approximately USD2 trillion (MIFC, 2016). Despite the soft global economic outlook, this industry is expected to grow as many more nations are embracing this alternative system that is proven to be not only profitable but also resilient to macroeconomic shocks. Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Ba)

  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Ashrafi, Kamran (2015)

  • Islamic finance assets in several countries comprise significant part of the financial system. In these countries there are certain issues that are unique to the Islamic finance and are overlooked by stakeholders, most importantly regulators. This paper investigates that Islamic finance product structuring, through a chain effect, may influence the financial stability of the Islamic financial system in a country. This is demonstrated through the securitization chain of an Islamic Mortgage Backed Security (MBS) to show that Islamic product structuring decisions at the retail level have a chain impact on the investor base for an Islamic MBS deriving from the mortgage assets ... Avai...

  • item.jpg
  • Research Monograph


  • Authors: Lahsasna, Ahcene; Shayad, Faisal (2014)

  • In managing liquidity, conventional banks resort to investing in treasury bills, overdrafts, placements with the central bank or with other conventional banks in order to gain interest, even if the placement is only overnight. However, it is not possible for Islamic banks to use the same instruments because of the numerous Shari'ah violations in them. Furthermore, Islamic banks have alternative financial products that are derived from Islamic jurisprudence. They can use various contracts such as qard hasan (benevolent loan), mudarabah (profit sharing between a capital provider and an entrepreneur who contributes only his labor and expertise), murabahah (mark-up sale), or other Shari'a...

  • Issues_in_Islamic_equities_mansur_et_al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur; Mustaffa Kamil, Nazrol Kamil; Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath (2018)

  • This article reviews the current literature on Islamic equities. Our survey indicates that the bulk of articles is quantitative or empirical in nature, with a notable dearth of theoretical works. Among the common research themes explored by these articles are comparative performances of Islamic equities visa-vis their conventional counterparts, comparisons of Islamic portfolios with SRI funds, and empirically articulating portfolio diversification benefits associated with Islamic equities. In addition, numerous articles discuss idiosyncrasies of Shari'ah compliant stocks and portfolios under subthemes such as volatility, risk factors, and performance attributes. This survey also inclu...

Browsing by Topic Islamic capital markets

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 70 to 79 of 151
  • chapter 5_the islamic capital market_obiyathulla.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath (2017)

  • Capital markets play an increasingly important role in modern economies. Though a part of the financial sector which they share with the banking system, capital markets while complementing banks can enhance risk sharing and thereby minimise macroeconomic vunerability. Economists typically divide the overall macro economy into two parts, the real sector and the financial sector. The real sector represents the productive capacity of the economy and produces the goods and services that accounts for a nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Ba)

  • chapter 7_islamic capital market_sukuk_ziyaad.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mahomed, Ziyaad (2017)

  • Sukuk are certificates of equal value that represent ownership in tangible assets, usufruct and services, and equity of identified project (AAOIFI, FAS 17 (2010)). They present undivided pro rata ownership of underliying assets (Securities Commission Malaysia, 2011). While sukuk are generally taken to be the counterpart of bonds, they differ from conventional bonds in six basic aspects (Ariff et al., 2012). This chapter explains the sukuk structure and its changing forms. Then, the chapter turns to the discussion of sukuk, capital structure and value of the firm. Before providing a conclusion. issues and challenges faced by the sukuk market are deliberated. Available in physical co...

  • islamic capital markets and development.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2013)

  • The question of whether capital markets (and the financial sector) are necessary for economic growth and development appeared to have been settled. However, the recent spate of financial crises and the devastating effect they have had on growth and macroeconomic stability have re-stoked questions; not so much about whether the capital markets are necessary for growth as whether they are playing the role expected of them.

  • islamic_capital_markets_comparative_approach_cover.jpg.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2013)

  • The book begins with an introductory chapter of founding thoughts of markets, asset prices, risk, uncertainty, and risk sharing. The risk-sharing philosophy runs throughout the book. The first three chapters provide the foundation. Chapter 4 through 12 examine each Islamic capital markets or conventional market and products. The final chapter, in providing an overall conclusion, examines the role of government in developing capital markets, specifically, Islamic capital markets.

  • Islamic_capital_markets.pdf.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Muhammad, Marjan; Sairally, Beebee Salma; Habib, Farrukh (2015)

  • The book presents the various aspects of the theory of Islamic capital markets (ICM) and its operations by starting with the simplest ideas and moving on to the complex applied issues. The topics covered include: an overview of ICM and its development; Shari'ah principles, contracts and issues; regulatory and governance frameworks; risk management, accounting and taxation issues; details on different segments of the ICM, including sukuk, Shari'ah-compliant stocks, Islamic fund management, Islamic private equity and venture capital, Islamic derivatives and Islamic structures investment products; and future directions for the ICM.

  • chapter 5_the islamic capital market_obiyathulla.jpg.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The global Islamic finance industry has evolved from a small industry to a dynamic, robust, and competitive one. Currently, the industry, built on the notion of justice and fairness, has a global asset size of approximately USD2 trillion (MIFC, 2016). Despite the soft global economic outlook, this industry is expected to grow as many more nations are embracing this alternative system that is proven to be not only profitable but also resilient to macroeconomic shocks. Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Ba)

  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Ashrafi, Kamran (2015)

  • Islamic finance assets in several countries comprise significant part of the financial system. In these countries there are certain issues that are unique to the Islamic finance and are overlooked by stakeholders, most importantly regulators. This paper investigates that Islamic finance product structuring, through a chain effect, may influence the financial stability of the Islamic financial system in a country. This is demonstrated through the securitization chain of an Islamic Mortgage Backed Security (MBS) to show that Islamic product structuring decisions at the retail level have a chain impact on the investor base for an Islamic MBS deriving from the mortgage assets ... Avai...

  • item.jpg
  • Research Monograph


  • Authors: Lahsasna, Ahcene; Shayad, Faisal (2014)

  • In managing liquidity, conventional banks resort to investing in treasury bills, overdrafts, placements with the central bank or with other conventional banks in order to gain interest, even if the placement is only overnight. However, it is not possible for Islamic banks to use the same instruments because of the numerous Shari'ah violations in them. Furthermore, Islamic banks have alternative financial products that are derived from Islamic jurisprudence. They can use various contracts such as qard hasan (benevolent loan), mudarabah (profit sharing between a capital provider and an entrepreneur who contributes only his labor and expertise), murabahah (mark-up sale), or other Shari'a...

  • Issues_in_Islamic_equities_mansur_et_al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur; Mustaffa Kamil, Nazrol Kamil; Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath (2018)

  • This article reviews the current literature on Islamic equities. Our survey indicates that the bulk of articles is quantitative or empirical in nature, with a notable dearth of theoretical works. Among the common research themes explored by these articles are comparative performances of Islamic equities visa-vis their conventional counterparts, comparisons of Islamic portfolios with SRI funds, and empirically articulating portfolio diversification benefits associated with Islamic equities. In addition, numerous articles discuss idiosyncrasies of Shari'ah compliant stocks and portfolios under subthemes such as volatility, risk factors, and performance attributes. This survey also inclu...