Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 128 to 137 of 165
  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Chowdhury, Mohammad Ashraful Ferdous; Haque, Md. Mahmudul; Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur (2017)

  • This study is the first attempt to conduct a comparative analysis of the internal and external determinants of the Islamic banks' profitability in the GCC region applying dynamic GMM, quantile regression, and wavelet coherence approaches. The dynamic GMM tends to indicate that equity financing and operating efficiency and macroeconomic variables such as money supply, and inflation are significantly related to Islamic banks' performance. The bank-specific variables such as credit risk, equity ratio, and cost-efficiency ratios are not significant at different percentiles. ROA is driven by credit risk, equity ratio, and cost-efficiency ratios (as evidenced in wavelet coherence analysis)....

  • regime_uncertainty_interest_rate_based_debt_financing_system_abbas_mughees.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Shaukat, Mughees (2012)

  • Evidence has been mounting (over the centuries) that the interest based debt financing regime is under ever increasing distress. All of the earlier crises whatever label they carried - exchange rate crisis or banking crisis have been debt crises in essence. At the present, empirical research suggests that the debt-to-GDP ratio of the richest members of the G-20 threatens to touch 120% mark by 2014. Moreover there is also evidence that out of securities worth $200 trillion in the global economy, no less than three-fourth represent interest based debt. It is difficult to see how this massive debt volume can be validated by the underlying productive capacity of the global economy. This p...

  • remedy_banking_crises_what_chicago_islam_have_common_comment_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2004)

  • Repeated failure of banks led some economists to believe that the banking and financial system may be suffering from structural problems and is in need of fundamental reform. The Islamic monetary system is known to consider demand and investment deposits as two distinct contracts. Demand deposits are merely loans that are fully guaranteed by banks and must be returned on demand. Investment deposits are given to banks on a profit-and-loss sharing basis. They are clearly associated with risk-taking and have specific maturities which, in principle, are not revocable. Compared to conventional finance, this sounds like narrow banking. Garcia, Marino and Cibils (2000) find similarities betw...

  • research_islamic_banking_malaysia_guide_future_direction_shamsher_eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Musaeva, Gulzhan; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2014)

  • Although not a near equivalent of conventional banking in terms of size, the global Islamic banking industry has grown a very rapid pace in the last three decades. Malaysia has been at the forefront of this development since early 1980s and has earned a reputation of a global hub for Islamic banking. Since its inception, much research has been carried out in this area but there is no systematic documentation of research findings in Islamic banking., though much focus has been on aspects of efficiency and performance vis-a-vis the conventional counterparts. This warrants our relooking at the research - both theoretical and empirical - in different areas of Islamic banking in Malaysia, ...

  • IF_Hub_Issue_1_Research_Islamic_banking_Malaysia_Eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Authors: Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • Islamic banking has experienced some success globally, with an annual double digit growth rate (an average of 15% to 20% annually) in the last decade. But to maintain the momentum, the industry has to improve on a number of pertinent aspects. For instance, establishing a common regulatory, legislative, tax, and legal foundation, addressing cost-efficiency and integration issues for all Islamic financial markets in general and the Islamic banking sector in particular. Retrospectively, Malaysia, a rapidly developing vibrant economy has positioned itself as an international hub for Islamic banking and finance. The research interest on Islamic banking in Malaysia has been intensive but on...

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2013)

  • This paper responds to the criticism of the Zubair Diminishing Balance model for Islamic home financing that Ahmad Kameel Meera published in the ISRA Journal. The response argues that most of the comments of Meera are frivolous and misplaced. It reiterates that the ZDBM is much different from other models; it is cheaper for the customer without being costlier to the bank. more efficient in resource allocation and improves liquidity in the financial system. However, the mathematical appendix is a positive contribution of the paper.

  • risk_and_regulations.pdf.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Lewis, Mervyn K.; Ariff, Mohamed; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2014)

  • From a single product offering in 1963, the Islamic financial services industry has grown to an estimated $1.6 trillion in assets. Products must comply with profit and risk-sharing criteria and regulations preventing banks from venturing into activities with high risk and excessive uncertainty. This timely volume analyses these matters and considers the range of new products, discussing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Available in physical copy and ebook (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 R595L)

  • PhD_Risk_shifting_and_Islamic_banking_Alaa_Alaabed.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Alaabed, Alaa (2015)

  • Risk shifting is, axiomatically, absent in an ideal Islamic banking system, where equity holders are expected to share assets' upside and downside potential with investment account holders (depositors). The Islamic banking model, thus, provides unique paradigm with risk sharing at its core. However, the present formation of Islamic banking has grown out of conventional banking and uses many of its techniques and instruments. Whereas significant research has delineated the theoretical foundations of Islamic banking and its axiomatic characteristics, empirical assessment of the implications of present form Islamic banking is relatively limited and often focused on issues of efficiency, ...

  • risk_return_analysis_islamic_banks_investment_deposit_shareholders_fund_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Mohd. Zaini, Mohammad Ashadi (2008)

  • The purpose of this paper is to study the differences or variance in the yields of Islamic and conventional bank deposits and capital, respectively, in view of their contractual differences, namely the former which is based on equity and the latter on debt. The paper uses a financial ratio approach. It was found that deposit yields in conventional banks were lower than return on equity (ROE), which truly reflect the contractual differences between fixed deposit and bank's capital. Also, it was found that Islamic banks' deposit yield and ROEs do not reflect their risk-taking properties, as their variances were found to be smaller.

  • risk_sharing_financing_of_Islamic_banks_better_shielded_against_interest_rate risk_mansur.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Seho, Mirzet; Alaabed, Alaa; Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur (2016)

  • In theory, Risk Sharing-based Financing (RSF) is considered a corner stone of Islamic finance. It is argued to render Islamic banks more resilient to shocks. In practice, however, this feature of Islamic financial products is almost negligible. Instead, debt based instruments, with conventional like features, have overwhelmed the nascent industry. In addition, the framework of present-day economic, regulatory and financial reality inevitably exposes Islamic banks in dual banking systems to problems of conventional banks. This includes, but is not limited to, interest rate risk. Empirical evidence has, thus far, confirmed such exposures, despite Islamic banks' interest free operations....

Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 128 to 137 of 165
  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Chowdhury, Mohammad Ashraful Ferdous; Haque, Md. Mahmudul; Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur (2017)

  • This study is the first attempt to conduct a comparative analysis of the internal and external determinants of the Islamic banks' profitability in the GCC region applying dynamic GMM, quantile regression, and wavelet coherence approaches. The dynamic GMM tends to indicate that equity financing and operating efficiency and macroeconomic variables such as money supply, and inflation are significantly related to Islamic banks' performance. The bank-specific variables such as credit risk, equity ratio, and cost-efficiency ratios are not significant at different percentiles. ROA is driven by credit risk, equity ratio, and cost-efficiency ratios (as evidenced in wavelet coherence analysis)....

  • regime_uncertainty_interest_rate_based_debt_financing_system_abbas_mughees.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Shaukat, Mughees (2012)

  • Evidence has been mounting (over the centuries) that the interest based debt financing regime is under ever increasing distress. All of the earlier crises whatever label they carried - exchange rate crisis or banking crisis have been debt crises in essence. At the present, empirical research suggests that the debt-to-GDP ratio of the richest members of the G-20 threatens to touch 120% mark by 2014. Moreover there is also evidence that out of securities worth $200 trillion in the global economy, no less than three-fourth represent interest based debt. It is difficult to see how this massive debt volume can be validated by the underlying productive capacity of the global economy. This p...

  • remedy_banking_crises_what_chicago_islam_have_common_comment_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2004)

  • Repeated failure of banks led some economists to believe that the banking and financial system may be suffering from structural problems and is in need of fundamental reform. The Islamic monetary system is known to consider demand and investment deposits as two distinct contracts. Demand deposits are merely loans that are fully guaranteed by banks and must be returned on demand. Investment deposits are given to banks on a profit-and-loss sharing basis. They are clearly associated with risk-taking and have specific maturities which, in principle, are not revocable. Compared to conventional finance, this sounds like narrow banking. Garcia, Marino and Cibils (2000) find similarities betw...

  • research_islamic_banking_malaysia_guide_future_direction_shamsher_eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Musaeva, Gulzhan; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2014)

  • Although not a near equivalent of conventional banking in terms of size, the global Islamic banking industry has grown a very rapid pace in the last three decades. Malaysia has been at the forefront of this development since early 1980s and has earned a reputation of a global hub for Islamic banking. Since its inception, much research has been carried out in this area but there is no systematic documentation of research findings in Islamic banking., though much focus has been on aspects of efficiency and performance vis-a-vis the conventional counterparts. This warrants our relooking at the research - both theoretical and empirical - in different areas of Islamic banking in Malaysia, ...

  • IF_Hub_Issue_1_Research_Islamic_banking_Malaysia_Eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Authors: Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • Islamic banking has experienced some success globally, with an annual double digit growth rate (an average of 15% to 20% annually) in the last decade. But to maintain the momentum, the industry has to improve on a number of pertinent aspects. For instance, establishing a common regulatory, legislative, tax, and legal foundation, addressing cost-efficiency and integration issues for all Islamic financial markets in general and the Islamic banking sector in particular. Retrospectively, Malaysia, a rapidly developing vibrant economy has positioned itself as an international hub for Islamic banking and finance. The research interest on Islamic banking in Malaysia has been intensive but on...

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2013)

  • This paper responds to the criticism of the Zubair Diminishing Balance model for Islamic home financing that Ahmad Kameel Meera published in the ISRA Journal. The response argues that most of the comments of Meera are frivolous and misplaced. It reiterates that the ZDBM is much different from other models; it is cheaper for the customer without being costlier to the bank. more efficient in resource allocation and improves liquidity in the financial system. However, the mathematical appendix is a positive contribution of the paper.

  • risk_and_regulations.pdf.jpg
  • Book


  • Authors: Lewis, Mervyn K.; Ariff, Mohamed; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2014)

  • From a single product offering in 1963, the Islamic financial services industry has grown to an estimated $1.6 trillion in assets. Products must comply with profit and risk-sharing criteria and regulations preventing banks from venturing into activities with high risk and excessive uncertainty. This timely volume analyses these matters and considers the range of new products, discussing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Available in physical copy and ebook (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 R595L)

  • PhD_Risk_shifting_and_Islamic_banking_Alaa_Alaabed.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Alaabed, Alaa (2015)

  • Risk shifting is, axiomatically, absent in an ideal Islamic banking system, where equity holders are expected to share assets' upside and downside potential with investment account holders (depositors). The Islamic banking model, thus, provides unique paradigm with risk sharing at its core. However, the present formation of Islamic banking has grown out of conventional banking and uses many of its techniques and instruments. Whereas significant research has delineated the theoretical foundations of Islamic banking and its axiomatic characteristics, empirical assessment of the implications of present form Islamic banking is relatively limited and often focused on issues of efficiency, ...

  • risk_return_analysis_islamic_banks_investment_deposit_shareholders_fund_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Mohd. Zaini, Mohammad Ashadi (2008)

  • The purpose of this paper is to study the differences or variance in the yields of Islamic and conventional bank deposits and capital, respectively, in view of their contractual differences, namely the former which is based on equity and the latter on debt. The paper uses a financial ratio approach. It was found that deposit yields in conventional banks were lower than return on equity (ROE), which truly reflect the contractual differences between fixed deposit and bank's capital. Also, it was found that Islamic banks' deposit yield and ROEs do not reflect their risk-taking properties, as their variances were found to be smaller.

  • risk_sharing_financing_of_Islamic_banks_better_shielded_against_interest_rate risk_mansur.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Seho, Mirzet; Alaabed, Alaa; Mohammed Masih, Abul Mansur (2016)

  • In theory, Risk Sharing-based Financing (RSF) is considered a corner stone of Islamic finance. It is argued to render Islamic banks more resilient to shocks. In practice, however, this feature of Islamic financial products is almost negligible. Instead, debt based instruments, with conventional like features, have overwhelmed the nascent industry. In addition, the framework of present-day economic, regulatory and financial reality inevitably exposes Islamic banks in dual banking systems to problems of conventional banks. This includes, but is not limited to, interest rate risk. Empirical evidence has, thus far, confirmed such exposures, despite Islamic banks' interest free operations....