Browsing by Topic Islamic finance::Risk sharing in Islamic finance

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Showing results 1 to 10 of 17
  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Cikiryel, Burak (2017)

  • There are some fundamental problems encountered by developing countries such as over-accumulation of inefficient modes of saving, such as gold and real estate, dominance of banking sector as reflected in low public awareness towards risk-sharing instruments and alternatives, low share of public securities in household balance sheets. The fact that risk-sharing finance instruments can address most of the contemporary finance problems in an effective way, which forms the basis of this study. In this respect, the aim of this study is to illustrate case that a mudarabah-baed public finance instrument can offer comparable better risk-return profile for investors ... Available in physi...

  • item.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Naim, Muhammad Arzim (2015)

  • The objective of this study is to investigate the factors affecting the rise of Shariah non-compliance risk that can bring Islamic banks to succumb to monetary loss. The study is also intent to propose a measurement of Shariah non-compliance risk via accounting technique. Subsequently, the study has also entails to identify the causal modelling of the Shariah non-compliance risk ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HD 61 M952)

  • do_conventional_islamic_finance_share_common_epistemology_mirakhor_smolo.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Smolo, Edib (2011)

  • Simply stated, epistemology deals with the question of what we know about a phenomenon and how do we know it. The practitioners use the term Islamic finance industry (IFI) to refer to their activities in designing and trading “Shari’ah-compliant” ways and means of financing. Taxonomically, industries in an economy belong to a sector and sectors belong to subsystems which in turn belong to a larger system. For example, a bank belongs to a banking industry which belongs to the financial sector which belongs to the financial subsystem which belongs to the larger economic system which, finally, belongs to an overall socio-political-economic system. Before the current inception of IFI, the...

  • item.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Hamzah, Siti Raihana (2015)

  • Economists and scholars have identified that risk shifting is the root cause of global financial crisis. Unfortunately, the danger of this debt-financing feature has been neglected. One piece of evidence is that global debt continues to grow at record level post crisis. Recognizing the relationship between risk shifting and the global financial crisis, this study encourages the need to curb this feature by defining types of securities that may induce firms to engage in risk shifting ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HG 187.4 S623)

  • financial_inclusion_islamic_finance_perspective_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Iqbal, Zamir; Mirakhor, Abbas (2012)

  • Enhancing financial inclusion or access to finance can make critical contributions to the economic development. Conventional mechanisms such as micro-finance, small-medium-enterprises (SME), and micro-insurance to enhance financial inclusion have been partially successful in enhancing the access and are not without challenges. Islamic finance, based on the concept of risk-sharing offers set of financial instruments promoting risk-sharing rather than risk-transfer in the financial system. In addition, Islam advocates redistributive risk-sharing instruments such as Zakah, Sadaqāt, Qard-al-hassan, etc, through which the economically more able segment of the society shares the risks facin...

  • mirakhor_pic1.jpg.jpg
  • Interview


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2016-02-25)

  • Risk sharing, shift or transfer, for example would can be seen at insurance company. Person transfers risk to bank then bank to borrower. Recently function switched or shift risk to someone else knowingly or unknowingly.

  • regulatory_framework_Islamic_finance_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2014)

  • Generally, the objective of a regulatory framework within which a financial system operates is established for the purpose of protecting the system from abuses that may threaten the stability of financial relations. In doing so, attention is paid to the risk of financial transactions. The risk of any transaction can be managed in three ways. Risk can be transferred, shifted or shared. Depositors transfer their risk to a bank that then transfers it to borrowers. In this case the bank is an intermediary. Risk can be shifted in two different ways. A person shifts the risk of life or health to an insurance company with full knowledge and acquiescence of the latter that accepts the shifted...

  • regulatory_framework_for_islamic_finance_muawanah_obiyathulla_abbas.JPG.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Lajis, Siti Muawanah; Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2016)

  • The role of regulation extends beyond ensuring stability and confidence in the financial system, as it is also behavioral shaper of market players. The laws, standards, and guidelines issued are instrumental in creating an incentive structure for market players to behave in certain ways. Using incentive audit approach, this paper attempts to examine the efficacy of the evolving Malaysian regulatory and supervisory framework for Islamic banking, in preserving financial stability as well as supporting the growth of the financial system and real economy. The findings suggest that the present framework unintentionally misaligns incentives and discourages Islamic banks from fully embracing...

  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Hassaan, Mohamed (2015)

  • Financial intermediaries such as banks face different risks during the course of their business. Handling these risks become more challenging especially while operating in a competitive market environment. As Islamic banking industry is relatively new, an adequate regulatory and legal framework to support the industry is still lacking in many countries. Further the nature of risk faced by Islamic banks in certain circumstances is different at the organizational and product level as compared to their conventional counterparts ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HD 61 M697)

Browsing by Topic Islamic finance::Risk sharing in Islamic finance

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 1 to 10 of 17
  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Cikiryel, Burak (2017)

  • There are some fundamental problems encountered by developing countries such as over-accumulation of inefficient modes of saving, such as gold and real estate, dominance of banking sector as reflected in low public awareness towards risk-sharing instruments and alternatives, low share of public securities in household balance sheets. The fact that risk-sharing finance instruments can address most of the contemporary finance problems in an effective way, which forms the basis of this study. In this respect, the aim of this study is to illustrate case that a mudarabah-baed public finance instrument can offer comparable better risk-return profile for investors ... Available in physi...

  • item.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Naim, Muhammad Arzim (2015)

  • The objective of this study is to investigate the factors affecting the rise of Shariah non-compliance risk that can bring Islamic banks to succumb to monetary loss. The study is also intent to propose a measurement of Shariah non-compliance risk via accounting technique. Subsequently, the study has also entails to identify the causal modelling of the Shariah non-compliance risk ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HD 61 M952)

  • do_conventional_islamic_finance_share_common_epistemology_mirakhor_smolo.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Smolo, Edib (2011)

  • Simply stated, epistemology deals with the question of what we know about a phenomenon and how do we know it. The practitioners use the term Islamic finance industry (IFI) to refer to their activities in designing and trading “Shari’ah-compliant” ways and means of financing. Taxonomically, industries in an economy belong to a sector and sectors belong to subsystems which in turn belong to a larger system. For example, a bank belongs to a banking industry which belongs to the financial sector which belongs to the financial subsystem which belongs to the larger economic system which, finally, belongs to an overall socio-political-economic system. Before the current inception of IFI, the...

  • item.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Hamzah, Siti Raihana (2015)

  • Economists and scholars have identified that risk shifting is the root cause of global financial crisis. Unfortunately, the danger of this debt-financing feature has been neglected. One piece of evidence is that global debt continues to grow at record level post crisis. Recognizing the relationship between risk shifting and the global financial crisis, this study encourages the need to curb this feature by defining types of securities that may induce firms to engage in risk shifting ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HG 187.4 S623)

  • financial_inclusion_islamic_finance_perspective_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Iqbal, Zamir; Mirakhor, Abbas (2012)

  • Enhancing financial inclusion or access to finance can make critical contributions to the economic development. Conventional mechanisms such as micro-finance, small-medium-enterprises (SME), and micro-insurance to enhance financial inclusion have been partially successful in enhancing the access and are not without challenges. Islamic finance, based on the concept of risk-sharing offers set of financial instruments promoting risk-sharing rather than risk-transfer in the financial system. In addition, Islam advocates redistributive risk-sharing instruments such as Zakah, Sadaqāt, Qard-al-hassan, etc, through which the economically more able segment of the society shares the risks facin...

  • mirakhor_pic1.jpg.jpg
  • Interview


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2016-02-25)

  • Risk sharing, shift or transfer, for example would can be seen at insurance company. Person transfers risk to bank then bank to borrower. Recently function switched or shift risk to someone else knowingly or unknowingly.

  • regulatory_framework_Islamic_finance_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2014)

  • Generally, the objective of a regulatory framework within which a financial system operates is established for the purpose of protecting the system from abuses that may threaten the stability of financial relations. In doing so, attention is paid to the risk of financial transactions. The risk of any transaction can be managed in three ways. Risk can be transferred, shifted or shared. Depositors transfer their risk to a bank that then transfers it to borrowers. In this case the bank is an intermediary. Risk can be shifted in two different ways. A person shifts the risk of life or health to an insurance company with full knowledge and acquiescence of the latter that accepts the shifted...

  • regulatory_framework_for_islamic_finance_muawanah_obiyathulla_abbas.JPG.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Lajis, Siti Muawanah; Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath; Mirakhor, Abbas (2016)

  • The role of regulation extends beyond ensuring stability and confidence in the financial system, as it is also behavioral shaper of market players. The laws, standards, and guidelines issued are instrumental in creating an incentive structure for market players to behave in certain ways. Using incentive audit approach, this paper attempts to examine the efficacy of the evolving Malaysian regulatory and supervisory framework for Islamic banking, in preserving financial stability as well as supporting the growth of the financial system and real economy. The findings suggest that the present framework unintentionally misaligns incentives and discourages Islamic banks from fully embracing...

  • item.jpg
  • Master


  • Authors: Hassaan, Mohamed (2015)

  • Financial intermediaries such as banks face different risks during the course of their business. Handling these risks become more challenging especially while operating in a competitive market environment. As Islamic banking industry is relatively new, an adequate regulatory and legal framework to support the industry is still lacking in many countries. Further the nature of risk faced by Islamic banks in certain circumstances is different at the organizational and product level as compared to their conventional counterparts ... Available in physical copy only (Call Number: t HD 61 M697)