Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

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Showing results 91 to 100 of 164
  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2013)

  • This paper adds to the series of writings on Islamic home financing presented and published by the author since February 2010. It spells out certain norms Islamic banks must observe in home financing and demonstrates that the conventional model based on an Excel formula does not meet the stated norms. It may well be emphasized that in Islam the question of observing these norms arises before, and not after, the selection of the formula; additional juristic requirements may only follow subsequently. Is it not then strange many Islamic banks are using the formula to determine the periodic instalment payments in their home financing programs? The paper finds, for example, the popular Mus...

  • Issues_Islamic_banking_finance_Islamic_banks_Shari’ah-compliant_investment_sukuk_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2015)

  • This introductory article of the special issue “Islamic Banking and Finance II” highlights various studies on fast-growing Islamic finance industry. It focuses specifically on Islamic banking and Islamic capital market research. To date, scholarly research on Islamic finance is mainly confined to empirical verification of its performance on the argument that the Islamic finance is distinct from conventional finance. While more works need to be done to soundly and concretely justify the viability of Islamic finance, future works should aim at placing the Islamic foundations of the industry in proper theoretical settings beyond the statement that it is different. In addition, theoretica...

  • issues_in_the_risk_and_regulation_of_islamic_banking.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Ariff, Mohamed; Lewis, Mervyn K.; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2014)

  • This book is the result of an international collaboration of scholars, all specializing in the field of Islamic finance, publishing symposium findings under the Edward Elgar series on the Foundation of Islamic Finance. Following an initial volume, The Foundations of Islamic Banking. Theory, Practice and Education, 2011, the first volume in the series dealt with a specialized area, namely The Islamic Debt Market for Sukuk Securities (2012). The present book is entitled Risk and Regulation of Islamic Banking, and in comparison with the 2011 volume contains conceptual material, along with new ideas on Islamic banking products, risk, regulation and associated practical issues. Availabl...

  • issues of form and substance.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Saleem, Muhammad Yusuf (2013)

  • There is growing criticism levelled against Islamic banking and financial products where industry critics argue that Islamic banks' deposit and finance products are the eaxt replicas of their conventional counterparts in substance. The difference, they contend, is only in the "form" where some English terms are replaced by Arabic ones. They contend that the gift (hibah) given by Islamic banks to their wadi'ah account holders and profit share given to the mudharabah investment account holders resemble interest which conventional banks give to their savings account holders.

  • iwad_requirement_lawful_sale_critical_analysis_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2001)

  • This paper will argue that replacing riba' with al-bay' does not mean that the latter can imply any form of sale (al-bay') to justify Islamic legitimacy. Apart from the prohibition of uncertainties (gharar) in sale, the requirement of an equivalent countervalue (ciwa') must also be met. Risk (ghurm) and liability (iman) after sale and value-addition or effort (ikhtiyar) are the principal components of ciwa'. As such, any increase from sale must contain ciwa', otherwise riba' is implicated. In classical Islamic commercial contracts such as ijarah, salam and mudarabah, ciwa' is evident. However, the contracts of credit of al-murabahah or al-bay bithaman ajil are widely used by Islamic b...

  • laws_pertinent_to_corporate_governance_of_Islamic_banks_Malaysia_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Malaysia is the cranium of Islamic banking and the most sophisticated laws on the matter could be found in Malaysia. Corporate governance legal infrastructure of Islamic banks is an area that is not explored much. Whenever a person talks about the corporate governance of Islamic banks, people perceive it as Shariah governance or the regulation of the Shariah Advisory Boards established in the Islamic banks. It has been misconceived that Islamic banks only apply Shariah or Islamic law which is not codified as legislations but based on what the Shariah scholars who sit in Shariah Advisory Boards derive. This may be the reason as to why Islamic banks are often considered to be prone to t...

  • legal_evolution_Shariah_corporate_governance_Islamic_banking_in_Malaysia_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Corporate governance is not an easy term to define and there is no definition for available it. Some authors view corporate governance as an indescribable term like love and happiness; the nature of it is easy to understand, but it is difficult to describe in words. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's ('OECD') Principles of Corporate Governance of 20043 defines corporate governance as the system through which companies are directed and controlled. Shariah corporate governance on the other hand, simply refers to corporate governance affairs which are in consistent with Islamic law. Shariah governance4 is just one part of the broad principle of Shariah corporate...

  • lending_structure_bank_insolvency_risk_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: A. Rahman, Aisyah; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mydin Meera, Ahamed Kameel (2009)

  • This study investigates the impact of lending structure on the insolvency risk exposure. A comparative analysis between the insolvency risk behavior between the Islamic and conventional banks is made. Our findings show that real estate lending is positively related to the conventional banks’ risk, but inversely related to the Islamic banks’ risk exposure. Thus, the policy makers as well as the banks should react accordingly in the decision making process.

  • PhD_liquidity_risk_determinants_Syajarul_Imna.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Mohd Amin, Syajarul Imna (2016)

  • This research examines comparatively the impact of cost efficiency and other relevant determinants of liquidity risk of Islamic banks and conventional banks in 16 OIC countries from 1999 to 2013. The study employs three-stage empirical approaches to analyse the data. First, cost efficiency is estimated using DEA with the input output specifications based on intermediation approach and value added approach for traditional versus non-traditional banking activities. Second, liquidity risk determinants model is analysed using panel static (LSDV) and panel dynamic model (system GMM) ... Available in physical copy and downloadable format (Call Number: t HG 1656 A3 S981)

  • loopholes_shariah_corporate_governance_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Shariah corporate governance could be defined as the way in which a corporation is directed, managed and controlled through the application of Shariah law or in a manner that is consistent with Shariah law. In the modern world application of conventional corporate governance principles to Islamic banks, not all of the conventional practices are rejected; but rather, an additional layer of corporate governance principles derived from Shariah law is added to the existing layer of it. However, in the course of doing this, if the conventional corporate governance principles are contrary to the Shariah principles, then only the contradictory part of the conventional law would be harmonised...

Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 91 to 100 of 164
  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2013)

  • This paper adds to the series of writings on Islamic home financing presented and published by the author since February 2010. It spells out certain norms Islamic banks must observe in home financing and demonstrates that the conventional model based on an Excel formula does not meet the stated norms. It may well be emphasized that in Islam the question of observing these norms arises before, and not after, the selection of the formula; additional juristic requirements may only follow subsequently. Is it not then strange many Islamic banks are using the formula to determine the periodic instalment payments in their home financing programs? The paper finds, for example, the popular Mus...

  • Issues_Islamic_banking_finance_Islamic_banks_Shari’ah-compliant_investment_sukuk_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2015)

  • This introductory article of the special issue “Islamic Banking and Finance II” highlights various studies on fast-growing Islamic finance industry. It focuses specifically on Islamic banking and Islamic capital market research. To date, scholarly research on Islamic finance is mainly confined to empirical verification of its performance on the argument that the Islamic finance is distinct from conventional finance. While more works need to be done to soundly and concretely justify the viability of Islamic finance, future works should aim at placing the Islamic foundations of the industry in proper theoretical settings beyond the statement that it is different. In addition, theoretica...

  • issues_in_the_risk_and_regulation_of_islamic_banking.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Ariff, Mohamed; Lewis, Mervyn K.; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2014)

  • This book is the result of an international collaboration of scholars, all specializing in the field of Islamic finance, publishing symposium findings under the Edward Elgar series on the Foundation of Islamic Finance. Following an initial volume, The Foundations of Islamic Banking. Theory, Practice and Education, 2011, the first volume in the series dealt with a specialized area, namely The Islamic Debt Market for Sukuk Securities (2012). The present book is entitled Risk and Regulation of Islamic Banking, and in comparison with the 2011 volume contains conceptual material, along with new ideas on Islamic banking products, risk, regulation and associated practical issues. Availabl...

  • issues of form and substance.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Saleem, Muhammad Yusuf (2013)

  • There is growing criticism levelled against Islamic banking and financial products where industry critics argue that Islamic banks' deposit and finance products are the eaxt replicas of their conventional counterparts in substance. The difference, they contend, is only in the "form" where some English terms are replaced by Arabic ones. They contend that the gift (hibah) given by Islamic banks to their wadi'ah account holders and profit share given to the mudharabah investment account holders resemble interest which conventional banks give to their savings account holders.

  • iwad_requirement_lawful_sale_critical_analysis_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2001)

  • This paper will argue that replacing riba' with al-bay' does not mean that the latter can imply any form of sale (al-bay') to justify Islamic legitimacy. Apart from the prohibition of uncertainties (gharar) in sale, the requirement of an equivalent countervalue (ciwa') must also be met. Risk (ghurm) and liability (iman) after sale and value-addition or effort (ikhtiyar) are the principal components of ciwa'. As such, any increase from sale must contain ciwa', otherwise riba' is implicated. In classical Islamic commercial contracts such as ijarah, salam and mudarabah, ciwa' is evident. However, the contracts of credit of al-murabahah or al-bay bithaman ajil are widely used by Islamic b...

  • laws_pertinent_to_corporate_governance_of_Islamic_banks_Malaysia_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Malaysia is the cranium of Islamic banking and the most sophisticated laws on the matter could be found in Malaysia. Corporate governance legal infrastructure of Islamic banks is an area that is not explored much. Whenever a person talks about the corporate governance of Islamic banks, people perceive it as Shariah governance or the regulation of the Shariah Advisory Boards established in the Islamic banks. It has been misconceived that Islamic banks only apply Shariah or Islamic law which is not codified as legislations but based on what the Shariah scholars who sit in Shariah Advisory Boards derive. This may be the reason as to why Islamic banks are often considered to be prone to t...

  • legal_evolution_Shariah_corporate_governance_Islamic_banking_in_Malaysia_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Corporate governance is not an easy term to define and there is no definition for available it. Some authors view corporate governance as an indescribable term like love and happiness; the nature of it is easy to understand, but it is difficult to describe in words. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's ('OECD') Principles of Corporate Governance of 20043 defines corporate governance as the system through which companies are directed and controlled. Shariah corporate governance on the other hand, simply refers to corporate governance affairs which are in consistent with Islamic law. Shariah governance4 is just one part of the broad principle of Shariah corporate...

  • lending_structure_bank_insolvency_risk_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: A. Rahman, Aisyah; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mydin Meera, Ahamed Kameel (2009)

  • This study investigates the impact of lending structure on the insolvency risk exposure. A comparative analysis between the insolvency risk behavior between the Islamic and conventional banks is made. Our findings show that real estate lending is positively related to the conventional banks’ risk, but inversely related to the Islamic banks’ risk exposure. Thus, the policy makers as well as the banks should react accordingly in the decision making process.

  • PhD_liquidity_risk_determinants_Syajarul_Imna.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Mohd Amin, Syajarul Imna (2016)

  • This research examines comparatively the impact of cost efficiency and other relevant determinants of liquidity risk of Islamic banks and conventional banks in 16 OIC countries from 1999 to 2013. The study employs three-stage empirical approaches to analyse the data. First, cost efficiency is estimated using DEA with the input output specifications based on intermediation approach and value added approach for traditional versus non-traditional banking activities. Second, liquidity risk determinants model is analysed using panel static (LSDV) and panel dynamic model (system GMM) ... Available in physical copy and downloadable format (Call Number: t HG 1656 A3 S981)

  • loopholes_shariah_corporate_governance_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Shariah corporate governance could be defined as the way in which a corporation is directed, managed and controlled through the application of Shariah law or in a manner that is consistent with Shariah law. In the modern world application of conventional corporate governance principles to Islamic banks, not all of the conventional practices are rejected; but rather, an additional layer of corporate governance principles derived from Shariah law is added to the existing layer of it. However, in the course of doing this, if the conventional corporate governance principles are contrary to the Shariah principles, then only the contradictory part of the conventional law would be harmonised...