Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

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Showing results 117 to 126 of 165
  • PhD_oil_revenue_financial_development_role_institutions_Ruslan_Nagayev.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Nagayev, Ruslan (2017)

  • Almost every second barrel of oil is produced in the OIC region. It is expected that the influx of oil revenue will help in developing the financial markets and the economies of these countries. So, the accelerated growth of Islamic financial industry at a double-digit rate annually has been attributed to the liquidity generated from the oil production. However, the recent adverse shocks emanating from the international oil market (quadruple drop in oil price) have cast scepticism about the sustainability of financial sectors in OIC oil-producing countries in general and the growth of Islamic banking industry, in particular. Slumping oil prices are expected to reduce the liquidity ......

  • paradox_struggle_between_Islamic_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath; Wisham, Ismail; Hassan, Rusni (2010)

  • Malaysia is a multi religious and a multi ethnic society with a plural legal structure. The banking system of country is essentially dual in nature and hence, there are two different sets of legal framework working simultaneously. Today, the Islamic Banking system which emerged in 1983 has levelled up to the conventional banking system which had rooted itself in the society a long time ago. Whether we believe it or not there are challenges and clashes at hand due to the existence of the dual system in the society and they need to be addressed properly, so that the clashes between these two types of banking system can be minimized. There are several quarrels between conventional and I...

  • performance_islamic_bank_mainstream_bank_in_malaysia_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Abu Bakar, Mohd Afandi (2003)

  • The study found that Islamic banking scheme (IBS) banks have recorded higher return on assets (ROA) as they are able to utilize existing overheads carried by mainstream banks. As this lowers their overhead expenses, it is found that the higher ROA ratio for IBS banks does not imply efficiency. It is also inconsistent with their relatively low asset utilization and investment margin ratios. This finding confirmed our contention that Islamic banking that thrives on interest-like products (credit finance) is less likely to outshine mainstream banks on efficiency terms. Although Islamic credit finance products may have complied with Shariah rules, their lack of ethical content is not expe...

  • performance of islamic banks and conventional banks.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Ariff, Mohamed; Badar, Mohammad K.; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Hassan, Taufiq (2011)

  • In this chapter an attempt is made for the first time to assess the financial performance of Islamic banks and conventional banks by choosing a matched sample of banks to assess their financial performance across the world over a lenghty period. Islamic banking is based on replacing the pre-fixed-interest-based bank deposit-cum-lending activities with risk-sharing and profit-sharing principles advocated by Islam, which in turn appears to be consistent with the social norms of pre-modern societies prior to the rise of interest-based-fractioning banking in the last 200 years, which refers to the fractional-reserve banking from the close of the 18th century.

  • possible_legal_framework_pioneer_Islamic_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Wisham, Ismail; Muneeza, Aishath; Hassan, Rusni (2011)

  • The Maldives has been striving to pioneer Islamic banking for the past few years. For a starter, guidance from the emperor of Islamic banking would be indispensable. Malaysia is the emperor of it. Starting from 1983, it has been practicing Islamic banking up until now. Today, by gradually correcting the mistakes that has been made over the years, Malaysia has become the leading nation for Islamic banking. Malaysia is a multi-religious society, distinct from the Maldives. The point that should be noted here is that when Malaysia started Islamic banking, the only piece of banking legislation available in the country was one that supported the conventional banks. Hence it had to pave awa...

  • practice_Islamic_banking_system_Sudan_magda.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda (2005)

  • This paper sheds light on the practice of Islamic banking system in Sudan. Its main objective is to show how successful the Islamic banking system in Sudan is and how this system succeeded in converting all existing banks into interest-free banks. Moreover, it emphasises the establishment of new Islamic banks in all the regions of Sudan and shows how those banks succeeded in minimising dealing with interest, attracting more depositors and financing the different sectors. To achieve this, the paper reviews the emergence of the Islamic banking system in Sudan within the last three decades, presents the structure and operations of the Sudanese Islamic banks, and highlights their contribu...

  • CIAWM_Issue3_Practice_of_musharakah_mutanaqisah_at_Malaysian_Islamic_banks_Zulkarnain_Shamsher_Alam.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Authors: Muhamad Sori, Zulkarnain; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Asadov, Alam (2017)

  • Among many permissible Islamic finance products, Musharakah or the partnership contract was put forward as a true representation of the PLS concept in the late 1970s. However, due to challenges to fully implement this type of contract in practice, practitioners have improvised a more practical version of the partnership contract termed Musharakah Mutanaqisah (MM) (or Diminishing Partnership). Currently, Musharakah Mutanaqisah is applied in home financing by Islamic banks and proposed as a replacement for Bai Bithaman Ajil and Bay al Inah in Malaysia. Despite the increasing popularity of MM in home financing in the Malaysian Islamic banking industry, there are issues in the way the Isl...

  • profit_loss_distribution_pool_management_framework_ibi_pakistan_progress_issues_implications_shahulhameed.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ayub, Muhammad; Mohamed Ibrahim, Shahul Hameed (2013)

  • Pakistan is among the three countries that opted for economy-wide transformation to Islamic financial system in 1980s, the other two being Iran and Sudan. But the ‘non-interest based’ banking system introduced in mid-eighties was declared un-Islamic by the ‘Federal Shariat Court’ because the same was largely based on ‘buy-back’ (bai‘ al-‘Inah) and sale of debt instruments (bai‘ al dayn). In the new system introduced since December 2002, Islamic banking institutions (IBIs) operating in parallel with the conventional banks are using murarabah as the major mode to raise investment deposits from individuals as also the corporate sector. But based on the assumption that depositors’ risk to...

  • profit_sharing_ratios_mudaraba_contract_revisited_zubair.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2010)

  • This paper examines three interlinked issues: First, what is the current state of profit sharing in Islamic banking, that is, is the division of profi t between the banks and the depositors satisfactory? Second, can the profit sharing in a two-tier mudaraba contract give the same rate of return to depositors as the bank receives from the investment of their deposits in business? Finally, can the central bank use in some ways the profi t sharing ratio along with the rate of interest as an instrument for credit control in a dual banking system? The answer to the first two questions is in the negative. To the third, a tentative response is yes. The paper also suggests a policy tool the c...

  • a_proposal_designed_calibrating_liquidity_coverage_ratio_Islamic_banks_adam et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Dolgun, Muhammed Habib; Mirakhor, Abbas; Ng, Adam Boon Ka (2019)

  • This paper aims to critically investigate the liquidity risk management of Islamic banks and develop an alternative regulatory framework appropriate for liquidity management of these banks. The specific risk profile of an Islamic bank requires developing a new and more efficient regulatory framework, which relies on risk-sharing and symmetric information among parties. The paper makes a differentiation between small local banks and internationally active Islamic banks and proposes to apply liquidity requirements only for internationally active Islamic banks. A new proposal for the liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) of Islamic banks is developed in this paper towards mitigating risks and c...

Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 117 to 126 of 165
  • PhD_oil_revenue_financial_development_role_institutions_Ruslan_Nagayev.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Nagayev, Ruslan (2017)

  • Almost every second barrel of oil is produced in the OIC region. It is expected that the influx of oil revenue will help in developing the financial markets and the economies of these countries. So, the accelerated growth of Islamic financial industry at a double-digit rate annually has been attributed to the liquidity generated from the oil production. However, the recent adverse shocks emanating from the international oil market (quadruple drop in oil price) have cast scepticism about the sustainability of financial sectors in OIC oil-producing countries in general and the growth of Islamic banking industry, in particular. Slumping oil prices are expected to reduce the liquidity ......

  • paradox_struggle_between_Islamic_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath; Wisham, Ismail; Hassan, Rusni (2010)

  • Malaysia is a multi religious and a multi ethnic society with a plural legal structure. The banking system of country is essentially dual in nature and hence, there are two different sets of legal framework working simultaneously. Today, the Islamic Banking system which emerged in 1983 has levelled up to the conventional banking system which had rooted itself in the society a long time ago. Whether we believe it or not there are challenges and clashes at hand due to the existence of the dual system in the society and they need to be addressed properly, so that the clashes between these two types of banking system can be minimized. There are several quarrels between conventional and I...

  • performance_islamic_bank_mainstream_bank_in_malaysia_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Abu Bakar, Mohd Afandi (2003)

  • The study found that Islamic banking scheme (IBS) banks have recorded higher return on assets (ROA) as they are able to utilize existing overheads carried by mainstream banks. As this lowers their overhead expenses, it is found that the higher ROA ratio for IBS banks does not imply efficiency. It is also inconsistent with their relatively low asset utilization and investment margin ratios. This finding confirmed our contention that Islamic banking that thrives on interest-like products (credit finance) is less likely to outshine mainstream banks on efficiency terms. Although Islamic credit finance products may have complied with Shariah rules, their lack of ethical content is not expe...

  • performance of islamic banks and conventional banks.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Ariff, Mohamed; Badar, Mohammad K.; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Hassan, Taufiq (2011)

  • In this chapter an attempt is made for the first time to assess the financial performance of Islamic banks and conventional banks by choosing a matched sample of banks to assess their financial performance across the world over a lenghty period. Islamic banking is based on replacing the pre-fixed-interest-based bank deposit-cum-lending activities with risk-sharing and profit-sharing principles advocated by Islam, which in turn appears to be consistent with the social norms of pre-modern societies prior to the rise of interest-based-fractioning banking in the last 200 years, which refers to the fractional-reserve banking from the close of the 18th century.

  • possible_legal_framework_pioneer_Islamic_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Wisham, Ismail; Muneeza, Aishath; Hassan, Rusni (2011)

  • The Maldives has been striving to pioneer Islamic banking for the past few years. For a starter, guidance from the emperor of Islamic banking would be indispensable. Malaysia is the emperor of it. Starting from 1983, it has been practicing Islamic banking up until now. Today, by gradually correcting the mistakes that has been made over the years, Malaysia has become the leading nation for Islamic banking. Malaysia is a multi-religious society, distinct from the Maldives. The point that should be noted here is that when Malaysia started Islamic banking, the only piece of banking legislation available in the country was one that supported the conventional banks. Hence it had to pave awa...

  • practice_Islamic_banking_system_Sudan_magda.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda (2005)

  • This paper sheds light on the practice of Islamic banking system in Sudan. Its main objective is to show how successful the Islamic banking system in Sudan is and how this system succeeded in converting all existing banks into interest-free banks. Moreover, it emphasises the establishment of new Islamic banks in all the regions of Sudan and shows how those banks succeeded in minimising dealing with interest, attracting more depositors and financing the different sectors. To achieve this, the paper reviews the emergence of the Islamic banking system in Sudan within the last three decades, presents the structure and operations of the Sudanese Islamic banks, and highlights their contribu...

  • CIAWM_Issue3_Practice_of_musharakah_mutanaqisah_at_Malaysian_Islamic_banks_Zulkarnain_Shamsher_Alam.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Authors: Muhamad Sori, Zulkarnain; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Asadov, Alam (2017)

  • Among many permissible Islamic finance products, Musharakah or the partnership contract was put forward as a true representation of the PLS concept in the late 1970s. However, due to challenges to fully implement this type of contract in practice, practitioners have improvised a more practical version of the partnership contract termed Musharakah Mutanaqisah (MM) (or Diminishing Partnership). Currently, Musharakah Mutanaqisah is applied in home financing by Islamic banks and proposed as a replacement for Bai Bithaman Ajil and Bay al Inah in Malaysia. Despite the increasing popularity of MM in home financing in the Malaysian Islamic banking industry, there are issues in the way the Isl...

  • profit_loss_distribution_pool_management_framework_ibi_pakistan_progress_issues_implications_shahulhameed.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Ayub, Muhammad; Mohamed Ibrahim, Shahul Hameed (2013)

  • Pakistan is among the three countries that opted for economy-wide transformation to Islamic financial system in 1980s, the other two being Iran and Sudan. But the ‘non-interest based’ banking system introduced in mid-eighties was declared un-Islamic by the ‘Federal Shariat Court’ because the same was largely based on ‘buy-back’ (bai‘ al-‘Inah) and sale of debt instruments (bai‘ al dayn). In the new system introduced since December 2002, Islamic banking institutions (IBIs) operating in parallel with the conventional banks are using murarabah as the major mode to raise investment deposits from individuals as also the corporate sector. But based on the assumption that depositors’ risk to...

  • profit_sharing_ratios_mudaraba_contract_revisited_zubair.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2010)

  • This paper examines three interlinked issues: First, what is the current state of profit sharing in Islamic banking, that is, is the division of profi t between the banks and the depositors satisfactory? Second, can the profit sharing in a two-tier mudaraba contract give the same rate of return to depositors as the bank receives from the investment of their deposits in business? Finally, can the central bank use in some ways the profi t sharing ratio along with the rate of interest as an instrument for credit control in a dual banking system? The answer to the first two questions is in the negative. To the third, a tentative response is yes. The paper also suggests a policy tool the c...

  • a_proposal_designed_calibrating_liquidity_coverage_ratio_Islamic_banks_adam et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Dolgun, Muhammed Habib; Mirakhor, Abbas; Ng, Adam Boon Ka (2019)

  • This paper aims to critically investigate the liquidity risk management of Islamic banks and develop an alternative regulatory framework appropriate for liquidity management of these banks. The specific risk profile of an Islamic bank requires developing a new and more efficient regulatory framework, which relies on risk-sharing and symmetric information among parties. The paper makes a differentiation between small local banks and internationally active Islamic banks and proposes to apply liquidity requirements only for internationally active Islamic banks. A new proposal for the liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) of Islamic banks is developed in this paper towards mitigating risks and c...