Browsing by Topic Islamic finance::Fundamentals of Islamic finance

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  • epistemology_finance_misreading_smith_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2011-11-29)

  • Before the inception of the Islamic finance industry, there was what could be called a “market failure” in the conventional financial system. There was substantial unmet demand for Shari’a-compliant financial products. Islamic finance grew out of conventional finance to meet this demand. Muslim scholars writing mostly since the 1970s about Islamic finance focused on development of an Islamic finance system; they not only emphasised elimination of riba contracts but urged their replacement with risk-sharing contracts. The practitioners, most of whom had been operating in the conventional finance space, were however interested in developing ways and means of finance that, while Shari’a ...

  • how_to_achieve_further_progress_in_islamic_finance_mirakhor_IIFS_june_2014.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2014-12-01)

  • Islamic finance is a fairly young industry. It is only 30 years old. When I first began looking into the industry back in the late 1970s, the asset size was about US$50 million. The industry has now grown to reach US$1 trillion. This growth is a good sign; however, in order to progress further the industry and policy makers need to consider the lessons of the most recent financial crisis and explore the path that would take the industry forward without experiencing similar crises.

  • islamic_finance_structure_objective_mismatch_consequences_zubair.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2010)

  • This paper raises the issue of an initial structure-objective mismatch in the launching of Islamic finance. The abolition of interest and promotion of growth with equity were goals of the conceived system. These goals expressed a long run vision to improve the condition of the Muslim communities across the world. However, the organizational form adopted for Islamic finance was of the existing commercial banks which provided essentially short-term loans on interest to trade industry and commerce. The choice thus involved an intrinsic mismatch between the structure and objectives of Islamic finance. The mismatch did carry some advantages, but on a more important side it exposed Islamic ...

  • limited_purpose_banking_Islamic_finance_could_LPB_model_applied_Islamic_finance_edib_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Smolo, Edib; Mirakhor, Abbas (2014)

  • This paper primarily aims to review and analyze a new model for Islamic finance based on Laurence J. Kotlikoff's idea of limited purpose banking (LPB). In addition, this paper aims to highlight, explain and discuss various aspects of LPB and how it suits the original aspirations of pioneer writers in Islamic finance. Based on an extensive literature review, this paper aims to highlight, explain and discuss the reform of the Islamic finance industry based on Kotlikoff's model of LPB. Based on a modified LPB model, Islamic financial institutions could be established to provide specific services with clear aims and objectives. These LPB Islamic financial institutions would operate in a s...

  • recent crisis_lessons for Islamic finance_Abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Krichene, Noureddine (2009-09-01)

  • Two alternative explanations of the financial crisis have emerged. One relies on deviations from the efficient capital market hypothesis - emergence of bubbles and informational problems - to explain the causes of the crisis. An alternative explanation views financial crises as internally generated instability episodes that inevitably arise from the basic debt-credit interest rate relations. Based on a number of assumptions, theory has demonstrated the inherent stability of Islamic financial system. However, in practice the assumptions of theory are not met and, therefore, such stability cannot be taken for granted. For one thing, theory, inter alia, assumes a 100 percent reserve bank...

Browsing by Topic Islamic finance::Fundamentals of Islamic finance

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:  
Showing results 1 to 5 of 5
  • epistemology_finance_misreading_smith_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2011-11-29)

  • Before the inception of the Islamic finance industry, there was what could be called a “market failure” in the conventional financial system. There was substantial unmet demand for Shari’a-compliant financial products. Islamic finance grew out of conventional finance to meet this demand. Muslim scholars writing mostly since the 1970s about Islamic finance focused on development of an Islamic finance system; they not only emphasised elimination of riba contracts but urged their replacement with risk-sharing contracts. The practitioners, most of whom had been operating in the conventional finance space, were however interested in developing ways and means of finance that, while Shari’a ...

  • how_to_achieve_further_progress_in_islamic_finance_mirakhor_IIFS_june_2014.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas (2014-12-01)

  • Islamic finance is a fairly young industry. It is only 30 years old. When I first began looking into the industry back in the late 1970s, the asset size was about US$50 million. The industry has now grown to reach US$1 trillion. This growth is a good sign; however, in order to progress further the industry and policy makers need to consider the lessons of the most recent financial crisis and explore the path that would take the industry forward without experiencing similar crises.

  • islamic_finance_structure_objective_mismatch_consequences_zubair.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Hasan, Zubair (2010)

  • This paper raises the issue of an initial structure-objective mismatch in the launching of Islamic finance. The abolition of interest and promotion of growth with equity were goals of the conceived system. These goals expressed a long run vision to improve the condition of the Muslim communities across the world. However, the organizational form adopted for Islamic finance was of the existing commercial banks which provided essentially short-term loans on interest to trade industry and commerce. The choice thus involved an intrinsic mismatch between the structure and objectives of Islamic finance. The mismatch did carry some advantages, but on a more important side it exposed Islamic ...

  • limited_purpose_banking_Islamic_finance_could_LPB_model_applied_Islamic_finance_edib_abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Smolo, Edib; Mirakhor, Abbas (2014)

  • This paper primarily aims to review and analyze a new model for Islamic finance based on Laurence J. Kotlikoff's idea of limited purpose banking (LPB). In addition, this paper aims to highlight, explain and discuss various aspects of LPB and how it suits the original aspirations of pioneer writers in Islamic finance. Based on an extensive literature review, this paper aims to highlight, explain and discuss the reform of the Islamic finance industry based on Kotlikoff's model of LPB. Based on a modified LPB model, Islamic financial institutions could be established to provide specific services with clear aims and objectives. These LPB Islamic financial institutions would operate in a s...

  • recent crisis_lessons for Islamic finance_Abbas.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirakhor, Abbas; Krichene, Noureddine (2009-09-01)

  • Two alternative explanations of the financial crisis have emerged. One relies on deviations from the efficient capital market hypothesis - emergence of bubbles and informational problems - to explain the causes of the crisis. An alternative explanation views financial crises as internally generated instability episodes that inevitably arise from the basic debt-credit interest rate relations. Based on a number of assumptions, theory has demonstrated the inherent stability of Islamic financial system. However, in practice the assumptions of theory are not met and, therefore, such stability cannot be taken for granted. For one thing, theory, inter alia, assumes a 100 percent reserve bank...