Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

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Showing results 1 to 10 of 109
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  • Book


  • Khan, Mohsin S.; Mirakhor, Abbas (1987)

  • Islam proposes that the banking systems that operate on the basis of an ex ante fixed rate of interest be replaced by a profit-sharing system in which the rate of return to the financial resources is not known and is not fixed prior to the undertaking of the transaction. While in Islam interest is forbidden, trade and profits are permissible and in fact encouraged. The papers in this volume all address one or more of the basic questions at the theoretical level. They represents a start in the attempt to introduce rigor into the analysis of Islamic banking and finance, thereby clarifying the nature of the basic relationships underslying the system.

  • welfare_implications_interest-free_bank_asset_management_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (1989)

  • This paper introduces some theoretical aspects of Islamic banking asset management strategies for reducing economic instability. Since public welfare deteriorates during periods of inflation and unemployment, the procyclical behavior of modern interest-based commercial banks is known to aggravate these fluctuations and ipso facto produce an even more severe impact on welfare. The paper will show that equity-based Islamic banks contain some structural features that reduce these procyclical tendencies and therefore shield public welfare from further deterioration.

  • al_bay_bithaman_ajil_financing_impacts_islamic_banking_performance_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (1999)

  • The dual-banking system in Malaysia is expected to put Islamic banks at a disadvantage due to the latter's over-dependency on fixed rate asset financing such as al-bay' bithaman qjil and murabuhah. When interest rates are rising, rational product choice among non-Muslim customers is expected to produce a shifting effect that may frustrate deposit mobilization and at the same time able deplete an Islamic bank's earnings. The shifting effect occurs when NMC either transfer deposits from Islamic banks to conventional banks, or, in a period of declining interest rates, opt for loans rather than for deferred sale financing. These shifts occur solely due to pecuniary incentives sought by NMC as the suppliers of deposits or demanders of funds. During an economic slowdown normally a...

  • iwad_requirement_lawful_sale_critical_analysis_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2001)

  • This paper will argue that replacing riba' with al-bay' does not mean that the latter can imply any form of sale (al-bay') to justify Islamic legitimacy. Apart from the prohibition of uncertainties (gharar) in sale, the requirement of an equivalent countervalue (ciwa') must also be met. Risk (ghurm) and liability (iman) after sale and value-addition or effort (ikhtiyar) are the principal components of ciwa'. As such, any increase from sale must contain ciwa', otherwise riba' is implicated. In classical Islamic commercial contracts such as ijarah, salam and mudarabah, ciwa' is evident. However, the contracts of credit of al-murabahah or al-bay bithaman ajil are widely used by Islamic banking practitioners. To prove Islamic legitimacy, this contract must sh...

  • performance_islamic_bank_mainstream_bank_in_malaysia_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Abu Bakar, Mohd Afandi (2003)

  • The study found that Islamic banking scheme (IBS) banks have recorded higher return on assets (ROA) as they are able to utilize existing overheads carried by mainstream banks. As this lowers their overhead expenses, it is found that the higher ROA ratio for IBS banks does not imply efficiency. It is also inconsistent with their relatively low asset utilization and investment margin ratios. This finding confirmed our contention that Islamic banking that thrives on interest-like products (credit finance) is less likely to outshine mainstream banks on efficiency terms. Although Islamic credit finance products may have complied with Shariah rules, their lack of ethical content is not expected to motivate IBS banks to strive for efficiency through scale and scope economies.

  • x-efficiency_sudanese_islamic_banks_saiful_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Saaid, Abd elrhman Elzahi; Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Abdullah, Naziruddin (2003)

  • Important changes have taken place in the Sudanese banking industry since 1989. The transformation of the banking industry to conform to the Islamic principles has put the spotlight on the performance of the Islamic banks in Sudan. This study investigates the X-efficiency (technical and allocative) of these banks. The study used the basic Stochastic Frontier Approach (SFA). This is accomplished by decomposing the error term into two components, namely random noise (vi) and possible inefficiency (ui). The empirical results tend to suggest that banks in the sample had low levels of X-efficiency. This implied that the Sudanese Islamic banks were not optimizing their inputs usage. However, the results also showed that the inefficiency in the Sudanese Islamic banks could be more associated w...

  • remedy_banking_crises_what_chicago_islam_have_common_comment_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2004)

  • Repeated failure of banks led some economists to believe that the banking and financial system may be suffering from structural problems and is in need of fundamental reform. The Islamic monetary system is known to consider demand and investment deposits as two distinct contracts. Demand deposits are merely loans that are fully guaranteed by banks and must be returned on demand. Investment deposits are given to banks on a profit-and-loss sharing basis. They are clearly associated with risk-taking and have specific maturities which, in principle, are not revocable. Compared to conventional finance, this sounds like narrow banking. Garcia, Marino and Cibils (2000) find similarities between narrow banking and Islamic banking. As narrow banking seems to be an uncommon concept among speciali...

  • case_universal_banking_component_Islamic_banking_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2005)

  • Universal banking is one of the main components of Islamic banking. Islamic banks provide finance to enterprises through either sharing directly in the net results of their activities or financing their purchases of assets, goods and services on credit. We can therefore expect Islamic banks to hold equity in corporations and sit on their boards of directors. This paper aims to put forward the case of universal banking as a part of Islamic banking. A large amount of literature is surveyed that comes from banking theory, macroeconomic and monetary theory, as well as empirical studies about banking practices. The conclusion is that universal banking on its own is a sound practice that can offer developing countries special advantages. Such a conclusion is rather important because many of t...

  • islamic_banking_doing_things_right_doing_right_thing_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2005)

  • To do the right thing, the contract ('aqad) method is usually employed to define Syariah legitimacy of Islamic banks. Equally important, the Islamic banking business is expected to operate on the moral principles of risk-taking (ghorm), work (kasb) and responsibility (daman). By doing so, the ethico-legal dimension of Islamic banking can be made evident. While claiming Syariah legitimacy, doing things right is critical where Islamic banks must compete on the basis of efficiency. In this way, factors affecting bank performance such as size of capital, scale economies and adverse selection must not be discounted in determining the success of the Islamic banking business.

  • practice_Islamic_banking_system_Sudan_magda.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda (2005)

  • This paper sheds light on the practice of Islamic banking system in Sudan. Its main objective is to show how successful the Islamic banking system in Sudan is and how this system succeeded in converting all existing banks into interest-free banks. Moreover, it emphasises the establishment of new Islamic banks in all the regions of Sudan and shows how those banks succeeded in minimising dealing with interest, attracting more depositors and financing the different sectors. To achieve this, the paper reviews the emergence of the Islamic banking system in Sudan within the last three decades, presents the structure and operations of the Sudanese Islamic banks, and highlights their contribution to the different sectors.

Browsing by Topic Islamic banking

Showing results 1 to 10 of 109
  • item.jpg
  • Book


  • Khan, Mohsin S.; Mirakhor, Abbas (1987)

  • Islam proposes that the banking systems that operate on the basis of an ex ante fixed rate of interest be replaced by a profit-sharing system in which the rate of return to the financial resources is not known and is not fixed prior to the undertaking of the transaction. While in Islam interest is forbidden, trade and profits are permissible and in fact encouraged. The papers in this volume all address one or more of the basic questions at the theoretical level. They represents a start in the attempt to introduce rigor into the analysis of Islamic banking and finance, thereby clarifying the nature of the basic relationships underslying the system.

  • welfare_implications_interest-free_bank_asset_management_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (1989)

  • This paper introduces some theoretical aspects of Islamic banking asset management strategies for reducing economic instability. Since public welfare deteriorates during periods of inflation and unemployment, the procyclical behavior of modern interest-based commercial banks is known to aggravate these fluctuations and ipso facto produce an even more severe impact on welfare. The paper will show that equity-based Islamic banks contain some structural features that reduce these procyclical tendencies and therefore shield public welfare from further deterioration.

  • al_bay_bithaman_ajil_financing_impacts_islamic_banking_performance_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (1999)

  • The dual-banking system in Malaysia is expected to put Islamic banks at a disadvantage due to the latter's over-dependency on fixed rate asset financing such as al-bay' bithaman qjil and murabuhah. When interest rates are rising, rational product choice among non-Muslim customers is expected to produce a shifting effect that may frustrate deposit mobilization and at the same time able deplete an Islamic bank's earnings. The shifting effect occurs when NMC either transfer deposits from Islamic banks to conventional banks, or, in a period of declining interest rates, opt for loans rather than for deferred sale financing. These shifts occur solely due to pecuniary incentives sought by NMC as the suppliers of deposits or demanders of funds. During an economic slowdown normally a...

  • iwad_requirement_lawful_sale_critical_analysis_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2001)

  • This paper will argue that replacing riba' with al-bay' does not mean that the latter can imply any form of sale (al-bay') to justify Islamic legitimacy. Apart from the prohibition of uncertainties (gharar) in sale, the requirement of an equivalent countervalue (ciwa') must also be met. Risk (ghurm) and liability (iman) after sale and value-addition or effort (ikhtiyar) are the principal components of ciwa'. As such, any increase from sale must contain ciwa', otherwise riba' is implicated. In classical Islamic commercial contracts such as ijarah, salam and mudarabah, ciwa' is evident. However, the contracts of credit of al-murabahah or al-bay bithaman ajil are widely used by Islamic banking practitioners. To prove Islamic legitimacy, this contract must sh...

  • performance_islamic_bank_mainstream_bank_in_malaysia_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Abu Bakar, Mohd Afandi (2003)

  • The study found that Islamic banking scheme (IBS) banks have recorded higher return on assets (ROA) as they are able to utilize existing overheads carried by mainstream banks. As this lowers their overhead expenses, it is found that the higher ROA ratio for IBS banks does not imply efficiency. It is also inconsistent with their relatively low asset utilization and investment margin ratios. This finding confirmed our contention that Islamic banking that thrives on interest-like products (credit finance) is less likely to outshine mainstream banks on efficiency terms. Although Islamic credit finance products may have complied with Shariah rules, their lack of ethical content is not expected to motivate IBS banks to strive for efficiency through scale and scope economies.

  • x-efficiency_sudanese_islamic_banks_saiful_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Saaid, Abd elrhman Elzahi; Rosly, Saiful Azhar; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Abdullah, Naziruddin (2003)

  • Important changes have taken place in the Sudanese banking industry since 1989. The transformation of the banking industry to conform to the Islamic principles has put the spotlight on the performance of the Islamic banks in Sudan. This study investigates the X-efficiency (technical and allocative) of these banks. The study used the basic Stochastic Frontier Approach (SFA). This is accomplished by decomposing the error term into two components, namely random noise (vi) and possible inefficiency (ui). The empirical results tend to suggest that banks in the sample had low levels of X-efficiency. This implied that the Sudanese Islamic banks were not optimizing their inputs usage. However, the results also showed that the inefficiency in the Sudanese Islamic banks could be more associated w...

  • remedy_banking_crises_what_chicago_islam_have_common_comment_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2004)

  • Repeated failure of banks led some economists to believe that the banking and financial system may be suffering from structural problems and is in need of fundamental reform. The Islamic monetary system is known to consider demand and investment deposits as two distinct contracts. Demand deposits are merely loans that are fully guaranteed by banks and must be returned on demand. Investment deposits are given to banks on a profit-and-loss sharing basis. They are clearly associated with risk-taking and have specific maturities which, in principle, are not revocable. Compared to conventional finance, this sounds like narrow banking. Garcia, Marino and Cibils (2000) find similarities between narrow banking and Islamic banking. As narrow banking seems to be an uncommon concept among speciali...

  • case_universal_banking_component_Islamic_banking_mabid.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Mahmoud Al-Jarhi, Mabid Ali Mohamed (2005)

  • Universal banking is one of the main components of Islamic banking. Islamic banks provide finance to enterprises through either sharing directly in the net results of their activities or financing their purchases of assets, goods and services on credit. We can therefore expect Islamic banks to hold equity in corporations and sit on their boards of directors. This paper aims to put forward the case of universal banking as a part of Islamic banking. A large amount of literature is surveyed that comes from banking theory, macroeconomic and monetary theory, as well as empirical studies about banking practices. The conclusion is that universal banking on its own is a sound practice that can offer developing countries special advantages. Such a conclusion is rather important because many of t...

  • islamic_banking_doing_things_right_doing_right_thing_saiful.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Rosly, Saiful Azhar (2005)

  • To do the right thing, the contract ('aqad) method is usually employed to define Syariah legitimacy of Islamic banks. Equally important, the Islamic banking business is expected to operate on the moral principles of risk-taking (ghorm), work (kasb) and responsibility (daman). By doing so, the ethico-legal dimension of Islamic banking can be made evident. While claiming Syariah legitimacy, doing things right is critical where Islamic banks must compete on the basis of efficiency. In this way, factors affecting bank performance such as size of capital, scale economies and adverse selection must not be discounted in determining the success of the Islamic banking business.

  • practice_Islamic_banking_system_Sudan_magda.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda (2005)

  • This paper sheds light on the practice of Islamic banking system in Sudan. Its main objective is to show how successful the Islamic banking system in Sudan is and how this system succeeded in converting all existing banks into interest-free banks. Moreover, it emphasises the establishment of new Islamic banks in all the regions of Sudan and shows how those banks succeeded in minimising dealing with interest, attracting more depositors and financing the different sectors. To achieve this, the paper reviews the emergence of the Islamic banking system in Sudan within the last three decades, presents the structure and operations of the Sudanese Islamic banks, and highlights their contribution to the different sectors.