Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim
Qualification:Ph.D.in Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA . (1996)
Fields/Area of Specialization:Macro/Monetary Economics
Prior to joining INCEIF, Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim served the Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) for three years (2009- 2011) and the Department of Economics, International Islamic University Malaysia for 12 years (1996-2008). He studied at Washington University where he received his A. B. (Economics) in 1990, A.M. (Economics) in 1991 and PhD in Economics in 1996. His research interest includes monetary economics, money and banking, analysis of financial markets and applied econometrics. He currently serves as Deputy President Academic (DPA) of INCEIF and as Dean for School of Graduate and Professional Studies (SGPS).

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754

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93

Top Country : Malaysia

Showing results 1 to 10 of 120
  • Impact_of_non_intermediation_activities_of_banks_on_economic_growth_and_volatility_Mansor Ibrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohsin Ali; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Eskandar Shah Mohd Rasid (2022)

  • This paper investigates the impact of non-intermediation activities of banks on economic growth and volatility of OIC. For the purpose, we utilize LSDVC estimation approach using the sample of Organization of Islamic Countries (OIC) member countries for the period of 2001-2013. We find non-intermediation income to be insignificant for both economic growth and volatility of OIC member countries in general though it reduces volatility of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies. Intermediation activities are found to be insignificantly related with the growth of OIC member countries, but on the other hand, they are found to reduce volatility in OIC member countries. Our results are robu...

  • Islamic_finance_and_inclusive_growth_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mansor H. Ibrahim (2022)

  • The emergence of Islamic finance in the global financial scene has attracted much scholarly interest, leading to a plethora of studies examining the roles of Islamic finance in the economy. Generally, studies on Islamic finance focus on four areas - Islamic banking, Islamic capital markets, takaful and other Islamic finance. Among these, Islamic banking has received the most attention, with the primary focus on comparing Islamic with conventional banking based on performance. Studies in Islamic capital markets have centred on issues related to the performance and benefits of investment in Shari'ah-compliant shares and sukuk (Islamic bonds). Most recently, some attention has also been ...

  • Impact_of_bank_concentration_and_financial_development_on_growth_volatility_Mansor et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Edib Smolo; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Ginanjar Dewandaru (2021)

  • This study investigates the impact of bank concentration and financial development on economic volatility for the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) member countries. Employing dynamic panel models, we find no evidence that bank concentration is significantly related to economic volatility when it is entered independently in the models. Meanwhile, financial development lowers economic volatility. Extending the models to include market structure - financial development interaction, we note that the impact of bank concentration on volatility depends on the level of financial development within OIC countries. More specifically, the volatility-increasing effect of bank concentratio...

  • Ethical_investing_and_capital_structure_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Paresh Kumar Narayan; Dinh Hoang Bach Phan; Guangqiang Liu; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • We test the relevance of the trade-off, pecking order, and market timing theories of capital structure from the point of view of a stock's religious orientation. Using a unique sample of Islamic stocks, we discover the leverage speed of adjustment (SOA) to be faster compared to that in the literature on conventional stocks, consistent with trade-off theory. We hypothesize that this result is due to the risk-sharing principal of Islamic investments that substantially reduces market imperfections. The inclusion of variables belonging to other theories of capital structure does not change the SOA, implying the importance of the trade-off theory.

  • Competition_diversification_and_performance_in_dual_banking_a_panel_VAR_analysis_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Fazelina Sahul Hamid; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • This article investigates the dynamic relationship among competition, diversification and bank performance using data for 18 countries with a dual banking system over the period 2000 to 2016. Analyses using panel vector autoregression (P.V.A.R.) model, impulse response function (I.R.F.) and variance decomposition (V.D.C.) methods confirm that market power increases the profitability and the stability of banks the dual banking system while revenue diversification reduces them. Market power increases revenue diversification of banks. Segregating the sample of banks into emerging and developing countries, we find that positive impact of market power on profitability is stronger for emerg...

  • Islamic_banks_history,_stability_lessons_from_cooperative_banking_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosana Gulzar; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Ariff Abdul Kareem (2021)

  • Islamic banking's profit-maximising fervour, building upon the use of interest-resembling products, has raised concerns about its Shariah authenticity and financial stability. While early Islamic economists envisioned an industry built on values of mutuality and participation, architects of Islamic banking have chosen to replicate interest-based conventional banking for the purpose of fast growth. This study has two objectives. First, to narrate the history of Islamic banking, from the theories postulated to the beginnings of the industry. This builds an understanding of why 'Islamic' banking operates as it does currently, which has implications for Shariah compliance and financial st...

  • Does_sectoral_diversification_of_loans_financing_improve_bank_returns_Mansor et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirzet Seho; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Abbas Mirakhor (2021)

  • This paper investigates the effects of sectoral diversification of loans and financing on the risk and the returns of banks in dual-banking systems. We employ the system GMM estimator on a unique panel data of 46 Islamic and 60 conventional banks from six countries over the period 2000-2015. Our findings reveal that sectoral diversification of loans and financing reduces the returns and increases the risk of both Islamic and conventional banks; the impact of sectoral diversification on returns varies across risk levels, with negative effects at low- and no effect at moderate- and high-risk levels; the difference between the impacts on Islamic and conventional banks across risk levels ...

  • Restructuring_and_bank_performance_in_dual_banking_system_Mansor Ibrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Raditya Sukmana; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • This paper assesses the impact of changing competition landscape and Islamic bank penetration on bank risk, profitability and capitalization. This study utilizes an unbalanced panel dataset consisting of 37 commercial banks over the period 1997 to 2015. The paper uses a panel VAR methodology to discern the interactions between bank competition and Islamic banking presence on one hand and bank performance on the other hand. We find evidence supportive of both competition - stability and competition - fragility views for conventional banks. The results suggest that bank competition improves conventional bank risk and, at the same time, lower profitability and capital holdings. As for Is...

  • Phd_Role_multinational_banks_international_transmission_financial_shocks_dual_banking_system_Naseem.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Naseem Bukhari (2020)

  • In the last two decades, financial integration and financial liberalization has resulted into proliferation of multinational banks across the globe. This augmenting growth in multinational banking is proclaimed to enhance financial stability in host countries as they bring about competitiveness and efficiency, introduce best governance practices, superior risk management techniques, product innovation,and above all have parental support at their disposal in times of financial distress. However, at the same time these multinational banks with significant market share can destabilize host economies as they may not only intensify their domestic crises but may also become a source of tran...

  • Are_Islamic_banks_suffering_from_a_model_misfit_comparison_with_cooperative_banks_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosana Gulzar; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Ariff Abdul Kareem (2020)

  • For the first time, this study investigates whether, in mimicking conventional banks, Islamic banks have become less stable than their theoretical equivalent: cooperative banks in Europe. Theoretically, the prohibition of interest should have pushed Islamic banks towards mutuality and profit-sharing, which have been argued as stabilising. In practice, however, banks are pushed for growth under a debt-driven commercial banking model, which is not only antithetical to the Shariah but is also destabilising. This may explain why empirical findings are still divergent in Islamic banking stability studies. Our study employs the generalised method of moments (GMM) system to compare the stabi...

Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim
author picture
Qualification: Ph.D.in Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA . (1996)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Macro/Monetary Economics
Prior to joining INCEIF, Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim served the Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) for three years (2009- 2011) and the Department of Economics, International Islamic University Malaysia for 12 years (1996-2008). He studied at Washington University where he received his A. B. (Economics) in 1990, A.M. (Economics) in 1991 and PhD in Economics in 1996. His research interest includes monetary economics, money and banking, analysis of financial markets and applied econometrics. He currently serves as Deputy President Academic (DPA) of INCEIF and as Dean for School of Graduate and Professional Studies (SGPS).
Showing results 1 to 10 of 120
  • Impact_of_non_intermediation_activities_of_banks_on_economic_growth_and_volatility_Mansor Ibrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohsin Ali; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Eskandar Shah Mohd Rasid (2022)

  • This paper investigates the impact of non-intermediation activities of banks on economic growth and volatility of OIC. For the purpose, we utilize LSDVC estimation approach using the sample of Organization of Islamic Countries (OIC) member countries for the period of 2001-2013. We find non-intermediation income to be insignificant for both economic growth and volatility of OIC member countries in general though it reduces volatility of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies. Intermediation activities are found to be insignificantly related with the growth of OIC member countries, but on the other hand, they are found to reduce volatility in OIC member countries. Our results are robu...

  • Islamic_finance_and_inclusive_growth_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Authors: Mansor H. Ibrahim (2022)

  • The emergence of Islamic finance in the global financial scene has attracted much scholarly interest, leading to a plethora of studies examining the roles of Islamic finance in the economy. Generally, studies on Islamic finance focus on four areas - Islamic banking, Islamic capital markets, takaful and other Islamic finance. Among these, Islamic banking has received the most attention, with the primary focus on comparing Islamic with conventional banking based on performance. Studies in Islamic capital markets have centred on issues related to the performance and benefits of investment in Shari'ah-compliant shares and sukuk (Islamic bonds). Most recently, some attention has also been ...

  • Impact_of_bank_concentration_and_financial_development_on_growth_volatility_Mansor et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Edib Smolo; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Ginanjar Dewandaru (2021)

  • This study investigates the impact of bank concentration and financial development on economic volatility for the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) member countries. Employing dynamic panel models, we find no evidence that bank concentration is significantly related to economic volatility when it is entered independently in the models. Meanwhile, financial development lowers economic volatility. Extending the models to include market structure - financial development interaction, we note that the impact of bank concentration on volatility depends on the level of financial development within OIC countries. More specifically, the volatility-increasing effect of bank concentratio...

  • Ethical_investing_and_capital_structure_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Paresh Kumar Narayan; Dinh Hoang Bach Phan; Guangqiang Liu; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • We test the relevance of the trade-off, pecking order, and market timing theories of capital structure from the point of view of a stock's religious orientation. Using a unique sample of Islamic stocks, we discover the leverage speed of adjustment (SOA) to be faster compared to that in the literature on conventional stocks, consistent with trade-off theory. We hypothesize that this result is due to the risk-sharing principal of Islamic investments that substantially reduces market imperfections. The inclusion of variables belonging to other theories of capital structure does not change the SOA, implying the importance of the trade-off theory.

  • Competition_diversification_and_performance_in_dual_banking_a_panel_VAR_analysis_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Fazelina Sahul Hamid; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • This article investigates the dynamic relationship among competition, diversification and bank performance using data for 18 countries with a dual banking system over the period 2000 to 2016. Analyses using panel vector autoregression (P.V.A.R.) model, impulse response function (I.R.F.) and variance decomposition (V.D.C.) methods confirm that market power increases the profitability and the stability of banks the dual banking system while revenue diversification reduces them. Market power increases revenue diversification of banks. Segregating the sample of banks into emerging and developing countries, we find that positive impact of market power on profitability is stronger for emerg...

  • Islamic_banks_history,_stability_lessons_from_cooperative_banking_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosana Gulzar; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Ariff Abdul Kareem (2021)

  • Islamic banking's profit-maximising fervour, building upon the use of interest-resembling products, has raised concerns about its Shariah authenticity and financial stability. While early Islamic economists envisioned an industry built on values of mutuality and participation, architects of Islamic banking have chosen to replicate interest-based conventional banking for the purpose of fast growth. This study has two objectives. First, to narrate the history of Islamic banking, from the theories postulated to the beginnings of the industry. This builds an understanding of why 'Islamic' banking operates as it does currently, which has implications for Shariah compliance and financial st...

  • Does_sectoral_diversification_of_loans_financing_improve_bank_returns_Mansor et al.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mirzet Seho; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Abbas Mirakhor (2021)

  • This paper investigates the effects of sectoral diversification of loans and financing on the risk and the returns of banks in dual-banking systems. We employ the system GMM estimator on a unique panel data of 46 Islamic and 60 conventional banks from six countries over the period 2000-2015. Our findings reveal that sectoral diversification of loans and financing reduces the returns and increases the risk of both Islamic and conventional banks; the impact of sectoral diversification on returns varies across risk levels, with negative effects at low- and no effect at moderate- and high-risk levels; the difference between the impacts on Islamic and conventional banks across risk levels ...

  • Restructuring_and_bank_performance_in_dual_banking_system_Mansor Ibrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Raditya Sukmana; Mansor H. Ibrahim (2021)

  • This paper assesses the impact of changing competition landscape and Islamic bank penetration on bank risk, profitability and capitalization. This study utilizes an unbalanced panel dataset consisting of 37 commercial banks over the period 1997 to 2015. The paper uses a panel VAR methodology to discern the interactions between bank competition and Islamic banking presence on one hand and bank performance on the other hand. We find evidence supportive of both competition - stability and competition - fragility views for conventional banks. The results suggest that bank competition improves conventional bank risk and, at the same time, lower profitability and capital holdings. As for Is...

  • Phd_Role_multinational_banks_international_transmission_financial_shocks_dual_banking_system_Naseem.pdf.jpg
  • PhD


  • Authors: Naseem Bukhari (2020)

  • In the last two decades, financial integration and financial liberalization has resulted into proliferation of multinational banks across the globe. This augmenting growth in multinational banking is proclaimed to enhance financial stability in host countries as they bring about competitiveness and efficiency, introduce best governance practices, superior risk management techniques, product innovation,and above all have parental support at their disposal in times of financial distress. However, at the same time these multinational banks with significant market share can destabilize host economies as they may not only intensify their domestic crises but may also become a source of tran...

  • Are_Islamic_banks_suffering_from_a_model_misfit_comparison_with_cooperative_banks_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Rosana Gulzar; Mansor H. Ibrahim; Mohamed Ariff Abdul Kareem (2020)

  • For the first time, this study investigates whether, in mimicking conventional banks, Islamic banks have become less stable than their theoretical equivalent: cooperative banks in Europe. Theoretically, the prohibition of interest should have pushed Islamic banks towards mutuality and profit-sharing, which have been argued as stabilising. In practice, however, banks are pushed for growth under a debt-driven commercial banking model, which is not only antithetical to the Shariah but is also destabilising. This may explain why empirical findings are still divergent in Islamic banking stability studies. Our study employs the generalised method of moments (GMM) system to compare the stabi...