Prof. Dr. Shamsher Mohamad Ramadili Mohd
Qualification: Ph.D.in Finance, University of Glasgow, Scotland, U.K. (1990)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Accounting;Finance
Prof. Dr. Shamsher holds a PhD in Finance from University of Glasgow in Scotland. Prior to INCEIF, he taught Finance courses at both undergraduate and graduate level at University Putra Malaysia (UPM). He served UPM for 30 years starting as a tutor in the same faculty in 1980. In 2012, he joined INCEIF as a Professor in Finance and Accounting. His areas of interest are accounting and finance. He is currently the Director of BNP-Paribas-INCEIF Centre for Islamic Asset and Wealth Management.

Content Distribution

Abstracts Views

1801

Views & Downloads

217

Top Country : Malaysia

Showing results 1 to 10 of 67
  • banking_liquidity_and_stock_market_prices_three_countries_in_ASEAN_tin_ariff_shamsher.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Tin-fah, Chung; Ariff, Mohamed; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2017)

  • This paper reports evidence of a banking liquidity impact on stock prices in the three Asean countries. Banking liquidity impacts suggested by Friedman is yet to be fully investigated nor verified despite several attempts. If improved liquidity of banks leads to credit expansion, which in turn leads to more positive net present value projects undertaken by firms, earnings of the latter must go up, and hence the share prices should rise. This link is worth an investigation. According to an influential of the US stock market, up to 52% of share returns are due to changes in the macro economy. Using a 3-equation structural model as well as employing corrections for cross-section dependence, we examine the link between money supply, liquidity and stock prices over 2001:4Q and 2012:2Q in thr...

  • determinants_driving_bank_performance_poi_shamsher_ariff.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Poi, Hun Sun; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Ariff, Mohamed (2017)

  • This paper extracts key variables from documented findings on bank intermediation margins of two types of banks in the Organisation of Islamic Countries. The intermediation margins used as the dependent variable are: net interest margins of conventional banks and the net profit margins of Islamic banks. To overcome the endogeneity issue of variables, an appropriate econometric procedure namely the dynamic GeneralizedMethod ofMoments is applied using data from 105 commercial banks over 14 years. The results are interesting: there is a significant difference in the margins across the two types of banks, 2.17% and 1.61% respectively. Capital adequacy, management quality, and diversification determinants significantly explain the margins of both types of banks. We also find evidence suggest...

  • item.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mahomed, Ziyaad; Mustaffa Kamil, Nazrol Kamil (2017)

  • Globally, Islamic banking grew by a compound annual growth rate of 17.3 percent between 2009 and 2014. The estimated size of the industry at the end of 2014 was given at US$2.1 trillion. This total follar value of assets held by the Islamic financial institutions is less than 2 percent of the conventional banking industry; nonetheless, this is a huge achievement, considering it started from a zero base in the 1970s (Ernst & Young, 2013). Through the rate of growth has declined in recent years, the industry has nevertheless managed to grow by more than 15 percent even during the 2009 global crisis, whereas the overall banking assets remained static and economic growth in almost all countries was negative. Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Mo)

  • IF_Hub_Issue_3_Flow_performance_relationship_Chaudhari_Shamsher_Eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Naeem Azmi, Choudhari Wajahat; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The motivation to examine flow-performance relationship of Shariah compliant funds (SCFs) and Socially responsible funds (SRFs) is that investors investing in these two funds have certain non-financial motives such as religious, ethical, environmental etc. Renneboog et al., (2011) explained that more the investor is averse to certain non-ethical or non-religious corporate behavior the more satisfaction he/she gets by investing in the funds that are in line with his/her ethical or religious position. The above conjecture that the SRF and SCF investors chose funds based on a dual objective of socially responsible/religious investing and financial gains is in line with the way generally these funds advertise their funds emphasizing the importance of socially responsible/religious investing.

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ariff, Mohamed; Cheng, Fan Fah; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2017)

  • This paper reports evidence of significant abnormal returns in call and put options in the New York Stock Exchange around the disclosure time of two equity funding events. The delta values as risk of options are used to adjust gross returns of calls and puts to obtain adjusted abnormal returns. Theory suggests any stock price increases around private placement announcement dates would make calls to become in-the-money, so call prices should increase: conversely, puts would become out-of-money so put prices should be unaffected. Stock price declines around seasoned equity announcement dates would make put prices to increase since puts become in-the-money: call prices, having become out-of-money, would not change. Further, if the spot to the derivative market price impact is due to both m...

  • item.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mahomed, Ziyaad (2017)

  • Islam has a unique dispensation on the concept of wealth, its ownership and distribution. Wealth is not regarded as an end per se, but a means to an end: the end being the paradise in the hereafter. Essentially, material possessions are considered the primary form of weakth, perceived to be generated, accumulated and/or invested by the one who acquired it. Inclusively, wisdom, knowledge, salvation and even contentment can all be categorized as wealth. From the Islamic perspective, Allah (to Him be Praise) is the true owner of all wealth and He entrusts it to man for beneficial use (Quran 20:6). Therefore, a Muslim is required to earn and invest wealth in Islamically permissibale methods in the real sector of the economy.

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Sukmadilaga, Citra; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Hassan, Taufiq (2017)

  • The relationship between ownership structures and company performance has been issue of interest among academics, investors and policy-makers. So far, there are still inconclusive findings that family and state ownership giving positive or negative impact on firm performance. This study employed technical efficiency and Malmquist productivity index to measure firm performance. Period of this study will be conduct from 1992 to 2007. Result of this study revealed that Technical efficiency study in Indonesia showed that state owned enterprises (SOEs) had better performance than family owned enterprises (FOEs) since SOEs' performance increased more stably during research period. Meanwhile Malaysia-based technical efficiency study demonstrated that FOEs samples had lower efficiency level...

  • effectiveness_shariah_committees_Malaysian_Islamic_financial_institutions_practical_perspective_shamsher_zulkarnain.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Muhammad Sori, Zulkarnain (2016-07-13)

  • An effective system of rules, practices and processes by which Islamic Financial Institutions (IFIs) are directed and controlled to ensure their business operations are Shariah-compliant has important implications on their reputation and their future growth. The Shariah Committee is a mandated requirement by the central bank on every Islamic Financial Institution (IFI) to ensure the expected level of Shariah-compliance in their business operations. Unlike their conventional counterparts that focus only on maximizing the wealth of shareholders, IFIs has an extra responsibility to protect the interests of all stakeholders (including shareholders) and ensure that no injustice of any kind is committed to any stakeholder. In performing their responsibilities, the Shariah Committees experienc...

  • musharakah_mutanaqisah_home_financing_issues_practice_alam_zulkarnain_zaher_shinaj_shamsher.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Asadov, Alam; Muhammad Sori, Zulkarnain; Anwer, Zaher; Shamsudheen, Shinaj Valangattil; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2016-06-25)

  • Musharakah Mutanaqisah (MM) mode of Islamic financing purchase of an asset, where the bank and customer enter into a contract of joint property ownership and the customer's ownership of the asset gradually increases throughout the financing period and fully own the asset after the last financial settlement. This mode of financing was introduced to mitigate the issue of unequal risk burden of conventional mortgage financing, where the bank just provide the financing and the customer bears all risk. MM financing reflects a true partnership contract through sharing of risk and reward between both parties. Though the MM mode of financing has the salient features to address the flaws of conventional mortgage financing, there are issues of operating this mode of financing in practice. Thi...

  • Socially_responsible_or_Shariah_compliant_wajahat_shamsher_eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Naeem Azmi, Choudhari Wajahat; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2016)

  • The mutual fund industry observed a remarkable growth of two distinct types of mutual funds during the last two decades, namely, Shariah-compliant funds (SCFs) and Socially responsible funds (SRFs). These alternative investment avenues were created for investors who are keen on investments that are Shariah-compliant and have better ethical standards than conventional funds. To fulfil these needs, the funds' investment strategies incorporate specific non-financial screening criteria based on ethical and religious guidelines, besides the typical risk-return financial screening.

Prof. Dr. Shamsher Mohamad Ramadili Mohd
author picture
Qualification: Ph.D.in Finance, University of Glasgow, Scotland, U.K. (1990)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Accounting;Finance
Prof. Dr. Shamsher holds a PhD in Finance from University of Glasgow in Scotland. Prior to INCEIF, he taught Finance courses at both undergraduate and graduate level at University Putra Malaysia (UPM). He served UPM for 30 years starting as a tutor in the same faculty in 1980. In 2012, he joined INCEIF as a Professor in Finance and Accounting. His areas of interest are accounting and finance. He is currently the Director of BNP-Paribas-INCEIF Centre for Islamic Asset and Wealth Management.
Showing results 1 to 10 of 67
  • banking_liquidity_and_stock_market_prices_three_countries_in_ASEAN_tin_ariff_shamsher.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Tin-fah, Chung; Ariff, Mohamed; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2017)

  • This paper reports evidence of a banking liquidity impact on stock prices in the three Asean countries. Banking liquidity impacts suggested by Friedman is yet to be fully investigated nor verified despite several attempts. If improved liquidity of banks leads to credit expansion, which in turn leads to more positive net present value projects undertaken by firms, earnings of the latter must go up, and hence the share prices should rise. This link is worth an investigation. According to an influential of the US stock market, up to 52% of share returns are due to changes in the macro economy. Using a 3-equation structural model as well as employing corrections for cross-section dependence, we examine the link between money supply, liquidity and stock prices over 2001:4Q and 2012:2Q in thr...

  • determinants_driving_bank_performance_poi_shamsher_ariff.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Poi, Hun Sun; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Ariff, Mohamed (2017)

  • This paper extracts key variables from documented findings on bank intermediation margins of two types of banks in the Organisation of Islamic Countries. The intermediation margins used as the dependent variable are: net interest margins of conventional banks and the net profit margins of Islamic banks. To overcome the endogeneity issue of variables, an appropriate econometric procedure namely the dynamic GeneralizedMethod ofMoments is applied using data from 105 commercial banks over 14 years. The results are interesting: there is a significant difference in the margins across the two types of banks, 2.17% and 1.61% respectively. Capital adequacy, management quality, and diversification determinants significantly explain the margins of both types of banks. We also find evidence suggest...

  • item.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mahomed, Ziyaad; Mustaffa Kamil, Nazrol Kamil (2017)

  • Globally, Islamic banking grew by a compound annual growth rate of 17.3 percent between 2009 and 2014. The estimated size of the industry at the end of 2014 was given at US$2.1 trillion. This total follar value of assets held by the Islamic financial institutions is less than 2 percent of the conventional banking industry; nonetheless, this is a huge achievement, considering it started from a zero base in the 1970s (Ernst & Young, 2013). Through the rate of growth has declined in recent years, the industry has nevertheless managed to grow by more than 15 percent even during the 2009 global crisis, whereas the overall banking assets remained static and economic growth in almost all countries was negative. Available in physical copy only (Call Number: HG 3368 A6 I82Mo)

  • IF_Hub_Issue_3_Flow_performance_relationship_Chaudhari_Shamsher_Eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Naeem Azmi, Choudhari Wajahat; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The motivation to examine flow-performance relationship of Shariah compliant funds (SCFs) and Socially responsible funds (SRFs) is that investors investing in these two funds have certain non-financial motives such as religious, ethical, environmental etc. Renneboog et al., (2011) explained that more the investor is averse to certain non-ethical or non-religious corporate behavior the more satisfaction he/she gets by investing in the funds that are in line with his/her ethical or religious position. The above conjecture that the SRF and SCF investors chose funds based on a dual objective of socially responsible/religious investing and financial gains is in line with the way generally these funds advertise their funds emphasizing the importance of socially responsible/religious investing.

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ariff, Mohamed; Cheng, Fan Fah; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2017)

  • This paper reports evidence of significant abnormal returns in call and put options in the New York Stock Exchange around the disclosure time of two equity funding events. The delta values as risk of options are used to adjust gross returns of calls and puts to obtain adjusted abnormal returns. Theory suggests any stock price increases around private placement announcement dates would make calls to become in-the-money, so call prices should increase: conversely, puts would become out-of-money so put prices should be unaffected. Stock price declines around seasoned equity announcement dates would make put prices to increase since puts become in-the-money: call prices, having become out-of-money, would not change. Further, if the spot to the derivative market price impact is due to both m...

  • item.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Mahomed, Ziyaad (2017)

  • Islam has a unique dispensation on the concept of wealth, its ownership and distribution. Wealth is not regarded as an end per se, but a means to an end: the end being the paradise in the hereafter. Essentially, material possessions are considered the primary form of weakth, perceived to be generated, accumulated and/or invested by the one who acquired it. Inclusively, wisdom, knowledge, salvation and even contentment can all be categorized as wealth. From the Islamic perspective, Allah (to Him be Praise) is the true owner of all wealth and He entrusts it to man for beneficial use (Quran 20:6). Therefore, a Muslim is required to earn and invest wealth in Islamically permissibale methods in the real sector of the economy.

  • item.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Sukmadilaga, Citra; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Hassan, Taufiq (2017)

  • The relationship between ownership structures and company performance has been issue of interest among academics, investors and policy-makers. So far, there are still inconclusive findings that family and state ownership giving positive or negative impact on firm performance. This study employed technical efficiency and Malmquist productivity index to measure firm performance. Period of this study will be conduct from 1992 to 2007. Result of this study revealed that Technical efficiency study in Indonesia showed that state owned enterprises (SOEs) had better performance than family owned enterprises (FOEs) since SOEs' performance increased more stably during research period. Meanwhile Malaysia-based technical efficiency study demonstrated that FOEs samples had lower efficiency level...

  • effectiveness_shariah_committees_Malaysian_Islamic_financial_institutions_practical_perspective_shamsher_zulkarnain.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad; Muhammad Sori, Zulkarnain (2016-07-13)

  • An effective system of rules, practices and processes by which Islamic Financial Institutions (IFIs) are directed and controlled to ensure their business operations are Shariah-compliant has important implications on their reputation and their future growth. The Shariah Committee is a mandated requirement by the central bank on every Islamic Financial Institution (IFI) to ensure the expected level of Shariah-compliance in their business operations. Unlike their conventional counterparts that focus only on maximizing the wealth of shareholders, IFIs has an extra responsibility to protect the interests of all stakeholders (including shareholders) and ensure that no injustice of any kind is committed to any stakeholder. In performing their responsibilities, the Shariah Committees experienc...

  • musharakah_mutanaqisah_home_financing_issues_practice_alam_zulkarnain_zaher_shinaj_shamsher.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Asadov, Alam; Muhammad Sori, Zulkarnain; Anwer, Zaher; Shamsudheen, Shinaj Valangattil; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2016-06-25)

  • Musharakah Mutanaqisah (MM) mode of Islamic financing purchase of an asset, where the bank and customer enter into a contract of joint property ownership and the customer's ownership of the asset gradually increases throughout the financing period and fully own the asset after the last financial settlement. This mode of financing was introduced to mitigate the issue of unequal risk burden of conventional mortgage financing, where the bank just provide the financing and the customer bears all risk. MM financing reflects a true partnership contract through sharing of risk and reward between both parties. Though the MM mode of financing has the salient features to address the flaws of conventional mortgage financing, there are issues of operating this mode of financing in practice. Thi...

  • Socially_responsible_or_Shariah_compliant_wajahat_shamsher_eskandar.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Naeem Azmi, Choudhari Wajahat; Ramadili Mohd, Shamsher Mohamad (2016)

  • The mutual fund industry observed a remarkable growth of two distinct types of mutual funds during the last two decades, namely, Shariah-compliant funds (SCFs) and Socially responsible funds (SRFs). These alternative investment avenues were created for investors who are keen on investments that are Shariah-compliant and have better ethical standards than conventional funds. To fulfil these needs, the funds' investment strategies incorporate specific non-financial screening criteria based on ethical and religious guidelines, besides the typical risk-return financial screening.