Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aishath Muneeza
Qualification:Ph.D.in Law in International Islamic University Malaysia. (2013)
Fields/Area of Specialization:Islamic Banking Law
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aishath Muneeza holds a Ph.D.in Law, Masters in Banking Law, and a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) all from the International Islamic University of Malaysia. She is a wealth of knowledge in her field of specialization. She has acquired significant education and work experience in Islamic Law, Islamic Banking & Finance and many other related subjects. She has presented numerous research papers in international conferences held in different parts of the world and has also published academic books and papers on Islamic Finance.

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Showing results 1 to 10 of 147
  • zakat_funds_moratorium_Maldives_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2020)

  • On the 22nd April 2020, the Ministry of Islamic Affairs of the Republic of Maldives announced that MVR1 million (US$63,895.8) will be allocated from Zakat funds to be given to the needy and poor aff ected by COVID-19. According to the World Bank, the Maldives is a middle-income country with GDP per capita of US$10,331 (2018). The Ministry of Gender and Family will receive the MVR1 million to help those affected. Before this, about MVR3 million (US$191,687) was spent by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs for Maldivians stranded in other countries due to lockdowns.

  • women_on_boards_recognizes_female_empowerment_islamic_finance_Aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women on Boards (WOB) has recognized the outstanding services provided by individuals in female empowerment in the Islamic finance industry by conferring them a special award of recognition at a ceremony held at Hotel Jen on the 30th April 2018. The chief guest of the ceremony was Minister of Home Affairs Azleen Ahmed. This is the first time in the history of the Maldives a dedicated set of awards was given to recognize female empowerment in the Islamic finance industry at a global event as it is rare to find an award in the Islamic finance space specially dedicated to female empowerment.

  • Women_empowerment_in_Islamic_finance_industry_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women empowerment is often associated with feminism. The moment a woman voices out issues on gender equality, there is a general perception that she is talking about compromising of quality and competency and arguing for undue career development and its progression in favour of women. This is indeed not the case and this is not what women are advocating for.

  • Weapon_to_end_poverty_closing_the_gender_wealth_gap_with_Islamic_wealth_management_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women represent more than half of the world's population, and make 40% of the world's labour force. Yet, according to the World Bank, they hold just 1% of the world's wealth. The sizable gender wealth gap is even more stark for women in developing countries, where they are more likely than men to do unpaid work, or be out of the workforce, more likely to work in industries with lower average pay, and less likely to be in high-paid senior positions, according to the World Economic Forum's Global Gender Gap Index 2017.

  • watchdogs_for_cross-border_Islamic_banking_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Wisham, Ismail; Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Islamic banking is unique and different from its conventional counterpart. This essentially means that we cannot carry out an apple to apple comparison between the two systems. Islamic banking is a system rooted in Islamic ideology. Overseeing of the whole system, thus naturally rests in the hands of those scholars who were educated in Islamic Shariah. This is the reason why several of the countries have established domestic Shariah advisory bodies, to monitor the administration of Islamic banking and the structuring of its products.

  • Waqfcoin_an_innovation_to_serve_humanity_magda_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda; Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Serving humanity must be an objective of all human beings. There are many ways in which humanity can be served. One of the most convenient ways to do this is via donation. The most critical challenge facing the donors is uncertainty in knowing whether the donation is spent on the intended purpose. The lack of transparency by trustees managing donation funds have created lack of trust among the donors when it comes to donating for humanity. The Islamic concept of Waqf in which donations are made for noble causes faces the same issue as well. This is the main reason why Waqf is declining in today's era, where finding donors is a challenge. According to reports, Singapore-based fintech f...

  • waqf_development_in_marawi_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohd Shukri, Nur Diyanah Syakirah; Ahmad Zamri, Siti Nuralina; Muneeza, Aishath; Ghulam, Hanif (2019)

  • Since 2017, the city of Marawi was left in ruins after five months of aerial bombardments and close-quarter fighting between Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) and government forces. Many buildings were destroyed; mosques and schools are no exceptions. While rebuilding efforts have begun in the city, the government has limited resources to fund city reconstruction and Waqf properties (e.g. mosques and schools) are not constitutionally considered as part of the government assets. Fortunately, the government seeks to channel funding for city reconstruction, including Islamic finance schemes. Therefore, this paper aims to assess the opportunities and challenges to rebuild Waqf prop...

  • time_make_hay_future_bright_sunny_Maldives_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2015)

  • Maldives is a famous tourist destination that is unique not only geographically, but it is also a 100% Muslim country that has a homogenous language and culture across the whole country that consists of 1,190 small islands. Though the economy and the financial landscape of the country is predominated by conventional financing methods and ideas, since the formation of the first Islamic bank of the country, Maldives Islamic Bank in 2011, the development of Islamic finance has grown exponentially. Since then, the country has witnessed a rapid and remarkable growth in Islamic finance that is worth studying. The year 2015 can be considered as a significant year that has brought the import...

  • the_progress_of_Islamic_finance_in_the_Maldives_Aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Islamic finance is still at the nascent stage in the Maldives. The country has only recently seen the inception and development of Islamic finance. The first form of Islamic finance that came to the country was takaful with the establishment of Amana Takaful Maldives in 2003. Islamic banking came to the country in 2011 when the only Islamic bank in the country, Maldives Islamic Bank, began operations. The two biggest service providers of Islamic finance in the country are these two entities, which are endeavoring to show the practicality of Islamic banking to the 100% Muslim citizens of the Maldives, constituting a population of about 300,000.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aishath Muneeza
author picture
Qualification: Ph.D.in Law in International Islamic University Malaysia. (2013)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Islamic Banking Law
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aishath Muneeza holds a Ph.D.in Law, Masters in Banking Law, and a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) all from the International Islamic University of Malaysia. She is a wealth of knowledge in her field of specialization. She has acquired significant education and work experience in Islamic Law, Islamic Banking & Finance and many other related subjects. She has presented numerous research papers in international conferences held in different parts of the world and has also published academic books and papers on Islamic Finance.
Showing results 1 to 10 of 147
  • zakat_funds_moratorium_Maldives_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2020)

  • On the 22nd April 2020, the Ministry of Islamic Affairs of the Republic of Maldives announced that MVR1 million (US$63,895.8) will be allocated from Zakat funds to be given to the needy and poor aff ected by COVID-19. According to the World Bank, the Maldives is a middle-income country with GDP per capita of US$10,331 (2018). The Ministry of Gender and Family will receive the MVR1 million to help those affected. Before this, about MVR3 million (US$191,687) was spent by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs for Maldivians stranded in other countries due to lockdowns.

  • women_on_boards_recognizes_female_empowerment_islamic_finance_Aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women on Boards (WOB) has recognized the outstanding services provided by individuals in female empowerment in the Islamic finance industry by conferring them a special award of recognition at a ceremony held at Hotel Jen on the 30th April 2018. The chief guest of the ceremony was Minister of Home Affairs Azleen Ahmed. This is the first time in the history of the Maldives a dedicated set of awards was given to recognize female empowerment in the Islamic finance industry at a global event as it is rare to find an award in the Islamic finance space specially dedicated to female empowerment.

  • Women_empowerment_in_Islamic_finance_industry_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women empowerment is often associated with feminism. The moment a woman voices out issues on gender equality, there is a general perception that she is talking about compromising of quality and competency and arguing for undue career development and its progression in favour of women. This is indeed not the case and this is not what women are advocating for.

  • Weapon_to_end_poverty_closing_the_gender_wealth_gap_with_Islamic_wealth_management_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Women represent more than half of the world's population, and make 40% of the world's labour force. Yet, according to the World Bank, they hold just 1% of the world's wealth. The sizable gender wealth gap is even more stark for women in developing countries, where they are more likely than men to do unpaid work, or be out of the workforce, more likely to work in industries with lower average pay, and less likely to be in high-paid senior positions, according to the World Economic Forum's Global Gender Gap Index 2017.

  • watchdogs_for_cross-border_Islamic_banking_aishath.PDF.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Wisham, Ismail; Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Islamic banking is unique and different from its conventional counterpart. This essentially means that we cannot carry out an apple to apple comparison between the two systems. Islamic banking is a system rooted in Islamic ideology. Overseeing of the whole system, thus naturally rests in the hands of those scholars who were educated in Islamic Shariah. This is the reason why several of the countries have established domestic Shariah advisory bodies, to monitor the administration of Islamic banking and the structuring of its products.

  • Waqfcoin_an_innovation_to_serve_humanity_magda_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Ismail Abdel Mohsin, Magda; Muneeza, Aishath (2018)

  • Serving humanity must be an objective of all human beings. There are many ways in which humanity can be served. One of the most convenient ways to do this is via donation. The most critical challenge facing the donors is uncertainty in knowing whether the donation is spent on the intended purpose. The lack of transparency by trustees managing donation funds have created lack of trust among the donors when it comes to donating for humanity. The Islamic concept of Waqf in which donations are made for noble causes faces the same issue as well. This is the main reason why Waqf is declining in today's era, where finding donors is a challenge. According to reports, Singapore-based fintech f...

  • waqf_development_in_marawi_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Authors: Mohd Shukri, Nur Diyanah Syakirah; Ahmad Zamri, Siti Nuralina; Muneeza, Aishath; Ghulam, Hanif (2019)

  • Since 2017, the city of Marawi was left in ruins after five months of aerial bombardments and close-quarter fighting between Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) and government forces. Many buildings were destroyed; mosques and schools are no exceptions. While rebuilding efforts have begun in the city, the government has limited resources to fund city reconstruction and Waqf properties (e.g. mosques and schools) are not constitutionally considered as part of the government assets. Fortunately, the government seeks to channel funding for city reconstruction, including Islamic finance schemes. Therefore, this paper aims to assess the opportunities and challenges to rebuild Waqf prop...

  • time_make_hay_future_bright_sunny_Maldives_aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2015)

  • Maldives is a famous tourist destination that is unique not only geographically, but it is also a 100% Muslim country that has a homogenous language and culture across the whole country that consists of 1,190 small islands. Though the economy and the financial landscape of the country is predominated by conventional financing methods and ideas, since the formation of the first Islamic bank of the country, Maldives Islamic Bank in 2011, the development of Islamic finance has grown exponentially. Since then, the country has witnessed a rapid and remarkable growth in Islamic finance that is worth studying. The year 2015 can be considered as a significant year that has brought the import...

  • the_progress_of_Islamic_finance_in_the_Maldives_Aishath.pdf.jpg
  • Industry Article


  • Authors: Muneeza, Aishath (2012)

  • Islamic finance is still at the nascent stage in the Maldives. The country has only recently seen the inception and development of Islamic finance. The first form of Islamic finance that came to the country was takaful with the establishment of Amana Takaful Maldives in 2003. Islamic banking came to the country in 2011 when the only Islamic bank in the country, Maldives Islamic Bank, began operations. The two biggest service providers of Islamic finance in the country are these two entities, which are endeavoring to show the practicality of Islamic banking to the 100% Muslim citizens of the Maldives, constituting a population of about 300,000.