Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim
Qualification: Ph.D.in Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA . (1996)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Macro/Monetary Economics
Prior to joining INCEIF, Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim served the Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) for three years (2009- 2011) and the Department of Economics, International Islamic University Malaysia for 12 years (1996-2008). He studied at Washington University where he received his A. B. (Economics) in 1990, A.M. (Economics) in 1991 and PhD in Economics in 1996. His research interest includes monetary economics, money and banking, analysis of financial markets and applied econometrics.

Content Distribution

Abstracts Views

1128

Views & Downloads

138

Top Country : Malaysia

Showing results 1 to 10 of 68
  • item.jpg
  • Book


  • Abdul Hamid, Baharom; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Kamarudin, Sazalina (2017)

  • This publication highlights the vast untapped potentials of Islamic finance if unleashed could help meet the massive demand for long-term financing for infrastructure development, promote financial inclusion and spur economic development. Most importantly, the publication underscores the challenges facing Islamic finance in the midst of the era of the new normal - the uncertainties in global economic outlook, accelerated technological changes stimulating expansion of new financial instruments and products, and rising regulatory demands.

  • do_we_need_bigger_islamic_banks_assessment_bank_stability_mansoribrahim_syedaun.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Rizvi, Syed Aun R. (2017)

  • In this paper, we evaluate from the stability point of view whether Islamic banks shouldstay small or should be bigger. More specifically, in relating bank stability to bank size, weexamine potential non-linear effects of size on bank soundness and the roles regulationplays in strengthening or weakening the size-stability relation using a panel sample of45 Islamic banks from 13 countries. Our results show that larger Islamic banks are morestable, at least when they surpass a certain threshold size. As regards regulation, activityrestrictions and capital stringency play a role in strengthening the stability-size relation. By contrast, the positive stability-size relation is weakened with more private monitoring andsupervisory power. Hence, our results point to the benefits of having bigg...

  • the_bank_lending_channel_monetary_policy_transmission_dual_banking_system_mansoribrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • This paper examines the impact of monetary policy on bank lending in a dual banking system, i.e. Malaysia. Making use of an unbalanced panel data set of 38 Islamic and conventional banks covering mostly 2001-2014, we find evidence that variations in monetary policy affect lending growth of Islamic banks and, to some extent, conventional banks. The results further reveal that, in comformity with studies using aggregate Islamic financing data, the Islamic financing growth reacts more strongly to monetary policy changes.

  • how_islamic_are_islamic_banks_non-linear_assessment_islamic_rate_conventional_rate_relations_mansoribrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Sukmana, Raditya; Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • In this paper, we perform a non-linear assessment of Islamic rate - conventional rate relations for the case of Malaysia. Using monthly data covering the period January 1999 to November 2016, we find strong evidence supporting non-linear reactions of the Islamic investment rates to conventional rates in the long run and/or short-run for all matched maturities. More precisely, the Islamic investment rates exhibit faster upward movement (slower downward movement) in responses to conventional deposit rate increases (decreases). The asymmetric pricing behaviour of Islamic banks however tends to weaken as maturity lengthens. Accordingly, we infer that Islamic banks do not rigidly peg their investment deposit rates to conventional deposit rates as some have claimed in questioning the Islamici...

  • IF_Hub_Issue_2_Putting_more_RICE_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • The rapid development of the Islamic banking sector in many Muslim countries especially in Malaysia and the Middle East and its increasing acceptance in non-Muslim world has captivated much interest in recent years. Its alleged resiliency during the recent global financial crisis has prompted some to offer the Islamic banking model as a solution to the malaise of the present interest rate-based banking system, normally dubbed as the conventional banking system. A pre-dominant view among Muslim professionals and policymakers holds Islamic banking to be more equitable and more stable, aspects well-noted to be critical for societal well-beings. This view is principally based on the belief in the Islamic banking business model as prescribed by Islamic laws or the Shariah. Islamic banking is...

  • item.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Abdul Kader Malim, Nurhafiza; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The rapid growth of Islamic finance, especially Islamic banking, and its perceived resiliency during the global financial crisis have been key features in recent Islamic finance literature. The Islamic banking business model has also started to attract empirical attention from economists as to whether it can instil the much needed stability into the financial system. While some studies have offered evidence that Islamic banks are relatively more stable and resilient than their conventional counterparts (Cihak and Hesse, 2010; Hasan and Dridi, 2010), there still remain several concerns over whether Islamic banks can play a distinct role in the stability of the financial system and can better allocate financial resources to productive activities.

  • banking_models_monetary_transmission_mechanism_Malaysia_are_Islamic_banks_different_malika.pdf.jpg
  • Journal article


  • Akhatova, Malika; Zainal, Mohd-Pisal; Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2016)

  • The present paper comparatively evaluates the credit channel of monetary transmission process of Islamic banks and conventional banks by focusing on their lending/financing behaviour in responses to monetary policy shocks as well as other shocks. Adopting structural vector autoregression (SVAR) specification, we validate the significant responses of both conventional bank credit and Islamic bank financing to monetary policy shocks. However, the dynamic behaviour of Islamic banks following monetary policy shocks as well as other shocks tends to be different. Our analysis indicates that the Islamic bank financing tends to respond immediately while the conventional bank credit exhibits delayed responses to interest rate hikes. These results are generally robust to alternative specification...

  • business_cycle_bank_lending_procyclicality_dual_banking_system_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2016)

  • The paper studies bank lending behaviour over the business cycle in a dual banking system, Malaysia, with the objective of ascertaining whether Islamic banks have a role in stabilizing credit. The study makes use of unbalanced panel data of 21 conventional banks and 16 Islamic banks covering mostly the period 2001–2013. Applying dynamic GMM estimators, we find the aggregate loans by banks to be pro-cyclical in conformity with existing studies. However, when we segregate the lending/financing behaviour of conventional and Islamic banks, the cyclicality of bank lending seems to be true only for conventional banks. As for the Islamic banks, the business cycle does not seem to affect their financing decisions. Indeed, there is indication that the Islamic banks in general and the full-fledge...

  • does_trust_contribute_stock_market_development_adam.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ng, Adam Boon Ka; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mirakhor, Abbas (2016)

  • In view of the increasing contributions of social capital in financial development, we examine the relevance of social capital in stock market development by applying Bayesian model averaging on 37 variables across 60 countries from 2000 to 2006. The results demonstrate that trust is a robust and positive determinant of stock market depth and liquidity, and that trust is the most relevant component of social capital in market development. Macroeconomic instability in the form of inflationary changes has a dampening effect on trust in the trading of stock. Further, social capital and its components, particularly trust, are more relevant to stock market development in countries with weak rule of law, non-Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (non-OECD) and Organization of...

  • dynamic_analysis_output_energy_consumption_co2_emissions_Malaysia_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Habibullah, Muzafar Shah (2016)

  • Present paper analyzes the interrelations between output, energy consumption, and carbon emissions in light of Malaysia's development experience from a commodity-based economy to an industrial-based economy by means of a vector autoregression (VAR) framework. The results suggest substantial interactions among the three variables. Moreover, manufacturing output tends to exert persistent influences on carbon emissions, energy consumption, and non-manufacturing output. Meanwhile, the significant causal relations from non-manufacturing output to energy variables are found for first few years. These results are robust to the inclusion of additional variables, namely, trade openness, investment, and population in the system.

Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim
author picture
Qualification: Ph.D.in Economics, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA . (1996)
Fields/Area of Specialization: Macro/Monetary Economics
Prior to joining INCEIF, Prof. Dr. Mansor H. Ibrahim served the Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) for three years (2009- 2011) and the Department of Economics, International Islamic University Malaysia for 12 years (1996-2008). He studied at Washington University where he received his A. B. (Economics) in 1990, A.M. (Economics) in 1991 and PhD in Economics in 1996. His research interest includes monetary economics, money and banking, analysis of financial markets and applied econometrics.
Showing results 1 to 10 of 68
  • item.jpg
  • Book


  • Abdul Hamid, Baharom; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Kamarudin, Sazalina (2017)

  • This publication highlights the vast untapped potentials of Islamic finance if unleashed could help meet the massive demand for long-term financing for infrastructure development, promote financial inclusion and spur economic development. Most importantly, the publication underscores the challenges facing Islamic finance in the midst of the era of the new normal - the uncertainties in global economic outlook, accelerated technological changes stimulating expansion of new financial instruments and products, and rising regulatory demands.

  • do_we_need_bigger_islamic_banks_assessment_bank_stability_mansoribrahim_syedaun.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Rizvi, Syed Aun R. (2017)

  • In this paper, we evaluate from the stability point of view whether Islamic banks shouldstay small or should be bigger. More specifically, in relating bank stability to bank size, weexamine potential non-linear effects of size on bank soundness and the roles regulationplays in strengthening or weakening the size-stability relation using a panel sample of45 Islamic banks from 13 countries. Our results show that larger Islamic banks are morestable, at least when they surpass a certain threshold size. As regards regulation, activityrestrictions and capital stringency play a role in strengthening the stability-size relation. By contrast, the positive stability-size relation is weakened with more private monitoring andsupervisory power. Hence, our results point to the benefits of having bigg...

  • the_bank_lending_channel_monetary_policy_transmission_dual_banking_system_mansoribrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • This paper examines the impact of monetary policy on bank lending in a dual banking system, i.e. Malaysia. Making use of an unbalanced panel data set of 38 Islamic and conventional banks covering mostly 2001-2014, we find evidence that variations in monetary policy affect lending growth of Islamic banks and, to some extent, conventional banks. The results further reveal that, in comformity with studies using aggregate Islamic financing data, the Islamic financing growth reacts more strongly to monetary policy changes.

  • how_islamic_are_islamic_banks_non-linear_assessment_islamic_rate_conventional_rate_relations_mansoribrahim.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Sukmana, Raditya; Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • In this paper, we perform a non-linear assessment of Islamic rate - conventional rate relations for the case of Malaysia. Using monthly data covering the period January 1999 to November 2016, we find strong evidence supporting non-linear reactions of the Islamic investment rates to conventional rates in the long run and/or short-run for all matched maturities. More precisely, the Islamic investment rates exhibit faster upward movement (slower downward movement) in responses to conventional deposit rate increases (decreases). The asymmetric pricing behaviour of Islamic banks however tends to weaken as maturity lengthens. Accordingly, we infer that Islamic banks do not rigidly peg their investment deposit rates to conventional deposit rates as some have claimed in questioning the Islamici...

  • IF_Hub_Issue_2_Putting_more_RICE_Mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Newsletter & Bulletin


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2017)

  • The rapid development of the Islamic banking sector in many Muslim countries especially in Malaysia and the Middle East and its increasing acceptance in non-Muslim world has captivated much interest in recent years. Its alleged resiliency during the recent global financial crisis has prompted some to offer the Islamic banking model as a solution to the malaise of the present interest rate-based banking system, normally dubbed as the conventional banking system. A pre-dominant view among Muslim professionals and policymakers holds Islamic banking to be more equitable and more stable, aspects well-noted to be critical for societal well-beings. This view is principally based on the belief in the Islamic banking business model as prescribed by Islamic laws or the Shariah. Islamic banking is...

  • item.jpg
  • Chapter in Book


  • Abdul Kader Malim, Nurhafiza; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mohd Rasid, Mohamed Eskandar Shah (2017)

  • The rapid growth of Islamic finance, especially Islamic banking, and its perceived resiliency during the global financial crisis have been key features in recent Islamic finance literature. The Islamic banking business model has also started to attract empirical attention from economists as to whether it can instil the much needed stability into the financial system. While some studies have offered evidence that Islamic banks are relatively more stable and resilient than their conventional counterparts (Cihak and Hesse, 2010; Hasan and Dridi, 2010), there still remain several concerns over whether Islamic banks can play a distinct role in the stability of the financial system and can better allocate financial resources to productive activities.

  • banking_models_monetary_transmission_mechanism_Malaysia_are_Islamic_banks_different_malika.pdf.jpg
  • Journal article


  • Akhatova, Malika; Zainal, Mohd-Pisal; Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2016)

  • The present paper comparatively evaluates the credit channel of monetary transmission process of Islamic banks and conventional banks by focusing on their lending/financing behaviour in responses to monetary policy shocks as well as other shocks. Adopting structural vector autoregression (SVAR) specification, we validate the significant responses of both conventional bank credit and Islamic bank financing to monetary policy shocks. However, the dynamic behaviour of Islamic banks following monetary policy shocks as well as other shocks tends to be different. Our analysis indicates that the Islamic bank financing tends to respond immediately while the conventional bank credit exhibits delayed responses to interest rate hikes. These results are generally robust to alternative specification...

  • business_cycle_bank_lending_procyclicality_dual_banking_system_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H. (2016)

  • The paper studies bank lending behaviour over the business cycle in a dual banking system, Malaysia, with the objective of ascertaining whether Islamic banks have a role in stabilizing credit. The study makes use of unbalanced panel data of 21 conventional banks and 16 Islamic banks covering mostly the period 2001–2013. Applying dynamic GMM estimators, we find the aggregate loans by banks to be pro-cyclical in conformity with existing studies. However, when we segregate the lending/financing behaviour of conventional and Islamic banks, the cyclicality of bank lending seems to be true only for conventional banks. As for the Islamic banks, the business cycle does not seem to affect their financing decisions. Indeed, there is indication that the Islamic banks in general and the full-fledge...

  • does_trust_contribute_stock_market_development_adam.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ng, Adam Boon Ka; Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Mirakhor, Abbas (2016)

  • In view of the increasing contributions of social capital in financial development, we examine the relevance of social capital in stock market development by applying Bayesian model averaging on 37 variables across 60 countries from 2000 to 2006. The results demonstrate that trust is a robust and positive determinant of stock market depth and liquidity, and that trust is the most relevant component of social capital in market development. Macroeconomic instability in the form of inflationary changes has a dampening effect on trust in the trading of stock. Further, social capital and its components, particularly trust, are more relevant to stock market development in countries with weak rule of law, non-Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (non-OECD) and Organization of...

  • dynamic_analysis_output_energy_consumption_co2_emissions_Malaysia_mansor.pdf.jpg
  • Journal Article


  • Ibrahim, Mansor H.; Habibullah, Muzafar Shah (2016)

  • Present paper analyzes the interrelations between output, energy consumption, and carbon emissions in light of Malaysia's development experience from a commodity-based economy to an industrial-based economy by means of a vector autoregression (VAR) framework. The results suggest substantial interactions among the three variables. Moreover, manufacturing output tends to exert persistent influences on carbon emissions, energy consumption, and non-manufacturing output. Meanwhile, the significant causal relations from non-manufacturing output to energy variables are found for first few years. These results are robust to the inclusion of additional variables, namely, trade openness, investment, and population in the system.